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R Version 2.11.1 32-bit on Windows 7

I got two data sets: data_A and data_B:

data_A

USER_A USER_B ACTION
1      11     0.3
1      13     0.25
1      16     0.63
1      17     0.26
2      11     0.14
2      14     0.28

data_B

USER_A USER_B ACTION
1      13     0.17
1      14     0.27
2      11     0.25

Now I want to add the ACTION of data_B to the data_A if their USER_A and USER_B are equal. As the example above, the result would be:

data_A

USER_A USER_B ACTION
1      11     0.3
1      13     0.25+0.17
1      16     0.63
1      17     0.26
2      11     0.14+0.25
2      14     0.28

So how could I achieve it?

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Normally, I'd use awk or perl for this. Would such a solution be ok? –  Peter G. Apr 24 '11 at 9:14
6  
@Peter G.: I would use Common Lisp; so what? Since there is no real algorithm involved, it is just a question of implementation, and that is very language-specific. –  Svante Apr 24 '11 at 10:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You can use ddply in package plyr and combine it with merge:

library(plyr)
ddply(merge(data_A, data_B, all.x=TRUE), 
  .(USER_A, USER_B), summarise, ACTION=sum(ACTION))

Notice that merge is called with the parameter all.x=TRUE - this returns all of the values in the first data.frame passed to merge, i.e. data_A:

  USER_A USER_B ACTION
1      1     11   0.30
2      1     13   0.25
3      1     16   0.63
4      1     17   0.26
5      2     11   0.14
6      2     14   0.28
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2  
That output isn't quite what the OP had - notice you have one extra row than the OP wanted. We need data_A but with an update to two of the ACTION entries. The equivalent base R of your answer would be: aggregate(ACTION ~ USER_B + USER_A, data = rbind(data_A, data_B), FUN = sum)[, c(2,1,3)] but I discounted this because it wasn't an update of data_A. –  Gavin Simpson Apr 24 '11 at 13:12
1  
@GavinSimpson Thank you for spotting this. I have now modified the code to use merge, rather than rbind. –  Andrie Apr 24 '11 at 13:19
    
Dies quick on two sets of 3M rows each after consuming 2Gb of ram. –  Artem Oboturov Dec 30 '12 at 23:10
1  
@ArtemOboturov If you want faster processing with lower memory consumption, try the data.table package –  Andrie Dec 30 '12 at 23:15

This sort of thing is quite easy to do with a database-like operation. Here I use package sqldf to do a left (outer) join and then summarise the resulting object:

require(sqldf)
tmp <- sqldf("select * from data_A left join data_B using (USER_A, USER_B)")

This results in:

> tmp
  USER_A USER_B ACTION ACTION
1      1     11   0.30     NA
2      1     13   0.25   0.17
3      1     16   0.63     NA
4      1     17   0.26     NA
5      2     11   0.14   0.25
6      2     14   0.28     NA

Now we just need sum the two ACTION columns:

data_C <- transform(data_A, ACTION = rowSums(tmp[, 3:4], na.rm = TRUE))

Which gives the desired result:

> data_C
  USER_A USER_B ACTION
1      1     11   0.30
2      1     13   0.42
3      1     16   0.63
4      1     17   0.26
5      2     11   0.39
6      2     14   0.28

This can be done using standard R function merge:

> merge(data_A, data_B, by = c("USER_A","USER_B"), all.x = TRUE)
  USER_A USER_B ACTION.x ACTION.y
1      1     11     0.30       NA
2      1     13     0.25     0.17
3      1     16     0.63       NA
4      1     17     0.26       NA
5      2     11     0.14     0.25
6      2     14     0.28       NA

So we can replace the sqldf() call above with:

tmp <- merge(data_A, data_B, by = c("USER_A","USER_B"), all.x = TRUE)

whilst the second line using transform() remains the same.

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