Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How do I find the name of an executing AppleScript?

REASON: I want to create a script that changes its behavior based on its filename. Something like:

if myname is "Joe" then ACTION1
else if myname is "Frank" then ACTION2
else ACTION3
share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

The normal way to get the name is by using "name of me". However applescripts are run by applescript runner so when you use that on a script you get "Applescript Runner" as the name. If you compile your script as an application then "name of me" will work. The only way to get the script name is by getting its path and extracting the name. Something like this would thus work for scripts...

getMyName()
tell me to display dialog result

on getMyName()
    set myPath to path to me as text
    if myPath ends with ":" then
        set n to -2
    else
        set n to -1
    end if
    set AppleScript's text item delimiters to ":"
    set myName to text item n of myPath
    if (myName contains ".") then
        set AppleScript's text item delimiters to "."
        set myName to text 1 thru text item -2 of myName
    end if
    set AppleScript's text item delimiters to ""
    return myName
end getMyName
share|improve this answer
    
The path to me info is great, but note that you can get to the filename more easily with name of (info for (path to me)). (info for also has a property to report the filename extension, but AppleScript's lack of a string-replacement command means that that's not helpful in this context.) If you want to get away with a single command for removing the extension, see my do shell script-based approach. –  mklement0 Sep 21 '12 at 13:51
    
I stopped using the "info for" command several versions of applescript ago. Apple had deprecated that command. Of course "info for" is still available but at some point if will go away so just be aware of that if you use it. –  regulus6633 Sep 21 '12 at 16:15
    
Thanks for letting me know - I did not know that info for was deprecated - best to avoid it, then. You can use its replacement as follows: tell application "System Events" to set myname to get name of (path to me). I have updated my answer accordingly. –  mklement0 Sep 21 '12 at 17:16
add comment

Here's a method that works for all of the following:

  • *.scpt files (compiled AppleScript files; run in AppleScript Editor or with osascript)
  • *.applescript files (uncompiled AppleScript files; run in AppleScript Editor or with osascript)
  • command-line scripts that directly contain AppleScript (marked as executable and starting with #!/usr/bin/env osascript):
  • *.app files created with AppleScript Editor
  • *.app files created with Automator that contain AppleScript actions

Note: By contrast, it does not work for the following:

  • OS X services created with Automator that contain AppleScript actions (special *.workflow files) - always reports 'WorkflowServiceRunner[.xpc]'
  • general-purpose *.workflow files created with Automator that contain ApplesScript actions and that are run with automator - always reports 'Automator Runner[.app]'

Get the name of the running script, including filename extension (.scpt, .app, or .applescript, as the case may be):

tell application "System Events" to set myname to get name of (path to me)

If you want to remove the filename extension with a single command, use the following, do shell script-based approach:

tell application "System Events" to set myname to do shell script "rawName=" & quoted form of (get name of (path to me)) & "; printf '%s' \"${rawName%.*}\""

Here's an all-AppleScript alternative that is more verbose (yet concise by AppleScript standards):

tell application "System Events"
    set myname to name of (path to me)
    set extension to name extension of (path to me)
end tell
if length of extension > 0 then
    # Make sure that `text item delimiters` has its default value here.
    set myname to items 1 through -(2 + (length of extension)) of myname as text
end if

Finally, here's a variation: a subroutine that you can call with set myname to getMyName():

on getMyName()
    local myName, tidSaved
    tell application "System Events"
        set myAlias to path to me -- alias to the file/bundle of the running script
        set myName to name of myAlias -- filename with extension, if any.
        if name extension of myAlias is not "" then -- strip away extension
            set {tidSaved, AppleScript's text item delimiters} to {AppleScript's text item delimiters, {""}}
            set myName to items 1 through -(2 + (length of (get name extension of myAlias))) of myName as text
            set AppleScript's text item delimiters to tidSaved
        end if
    end tell
    return myName
end getMyName
share|improve this answer
1  
The shell script doesn't work if the name contains single quotes or backslashes. You could escape the string with quoted form of and add shopt -u xpg_echo before the echo. –  Lri Sep 21 '12 at 7:18
    
@LauriRanta Good points, thank you; I've updated the post. (I had thought single-quoting would be enough, but, as you point out, it's not. While certain backslashes would have been fine, those that together with the following character happen to form an escape sequence cause problems. Note that in theory it should suffice to use echo -E instead of shopt -u xpg_echo, but inexplicably that misbehaves when run with do shell script.) –  mklement0 Sep 21 '12 at 15:07
1  
echo doesn't have an -E option by default in sh (or POSIX mode). –  Lri Sep 22 '12 at 6:00
    
Thanks, good to know - I hadn't realized that do shell script runs all commands in POSIX compatibility mode. –  mklement0 Sep 22 '12 at 13:56
1  
You could also use printf %s. shopt -uo posix; echo '\t' still prints a literal tab unless you add -E. The default shell of do shell script is /bin/sh, which is a version of bash that starts in POSIX mode and emulates some aspects of sh. –  Lri Sep 28 '12 at 18:07
show 3 more comments

An easier way to find out the base part of the path is using name of:

tell application "Finder"
    set p to path to me
    set nam to name of file p as text
end tell
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.