Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've read about python scopes and browsed questions here on stackoverflow but theres something i'd like to clarify.

I'm extracting a piece of code to a function, from what i used to it should take all the variables it's using as parameters. But, in python the variable address is determined at runtime so theres actually no need for the parameters. Since i'm new to python i wanted to know if there are other implications or conventions i should know about.

x = 5
x += 1
print x

is there any difference between the following refactoring of the above code :

def f(x):
  x += 1
  return x

x = 5
x = f(x)
print x

and:

def f():
  x++

x = 5
f()
print x

If not then, is one of the ways more commonly used or preferred in python ?

share|improve this question
6  
Looks like you have more to learn about Python than the scoping rules... and about scoping rules in general as well, the obvious difference that's totally language agnostic is that the latter uses a global variable, which is most definitely a HUGE difference. –  delnan Apr 24 '11 at 12:08
    
You did not even took the time for trying out your code in advance before posting....what do you expect? Comments on broken code? There is neither something like the '++' operator nor will your second piece of code work due to a "UnboundLocalError: local variable 'x' referenced before assignment".....clearly a -1 for a bad question and taking zero time for checking for code in advance. –  Andreas Jung Apr 24 '11 at 12:10
    
I must've over simplified the problem trying to make it short and concise and made some logical errors along the way. I did run into this problem working on real code and did try the different examples before posting the questions, it's just not exactly the ones in the question - which was clearly a mistake. –  yurib Apr 24 '11 at 12:39
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It's preferred not to use global variables, if not absolutely necessary. That said, in the second example you'd need global x declared before you refer to x.

So, first way:

  • f takes an argument x
  • Increments x
  • returns x + 1
  • the global x is not affected

The second way:

def f():
  global x
  x += 1

x = 1
f()
  • f has no arguments
  • Increments the global x

P.S. Python has no ++ operator. x += 1 is used instead

share|improve this answer
add comment

I upvote the question for two reasons:

1)

  • importing the notation x++ from other languages (C++ and Java) is a venial sin; who has never been absent-minded ?
  • not testing codes deserves a downvote, that's right, because it denotes that no tests have been performed to try to obtain oneself a certain number of observations and that's baaad
  • however I find the desire to understand notions concerning scopes, namespaces, global/local more commendable than the faults to be reproached

2)

It is certainly an unsatisfactory situation to be downvoted because of an approximate question while receiving an upvoted answer that contains itself some inadequate terms according to me. Terminology is particularly important in subjects in which controversial debates and confusionning descriptions may happen.

For exemple, for

def f(x): 
    x++ 
    return x
  • I wouldn't say that f receives an argument x, but that f receives x as an argument.
  • x is not incremented; rather: another object is created with a value resulting of the incrementation of the value of initial x

  • f doesn't returns x+1 , it returns the new object with the incremented value

EDIT 1

# f takes an argument x

In the call f(x) , I wouldn't say that f receives an argument x, because x isn't an argument in the absolute. x "becomes" an argument only relatively to a function, at the moment when it is passed to the function. So I rather say that in the call f(x) , the function f receives x AS an argument.

It may happen that one says "the argument Y" one time, as an understatement to express "Y , considered at a moment when it is passed as an argument to a function". This understatement is shorter; but what I think is that in a precise explanation such an easy way to express must be banned.

#Increments x

Refering to the code written in the question (case 1), this sentence is ambiguous because of the function written with a parameter x: does x refer to the x in the function or the x outside ? You'll say I nitpick, but for a newbie that doesn't know the data model and the working of functions well, the question is valid. What does f(x) mean in Python ? , is the x passed by value or passed by reference ? It could be that the operations inside f could change the x outside, why not, that's precisely what is in discussion, no ? That's why it is preferable to name the parameter of f with a different name than any of the names of the outside objects; I think the same as for the previous sentence: in a precise explanation, only cautious sentences and codes should be employed, to avoid confusionning ambiguities:

def f(N):
    N += 1
    return N
x = 5
x = f(x)
print x

And it should be explained that the instruction N += 1 triggers the creation of a new object with value incremented and that the local identifier N is rebound to this new object. And at this point, the global identifier x is still bound to the same object as before the call.

# returns x + 1

f doesn't returns x+1 , it returns the new object newly assigned to N with the incremented value

# the global x is not affected

What does it mean ? Before , global x has a value 5. After, global x has a value 6. During the execution of the operations inside f, the global x isn't affected, that's right: it is only when the new object (in fact its address..) is returned to the outside of f, and that the assignement x = f(x) is executed that global x is affected. But this sentence "the global x is not affected" is placed after "returns x + 1 ". No really, I understand nothing in such explanations.

End of EDIT 1

.

.

Concerning the second case

def f():
    global x 
    x += 1
  • I prefer to say that f has no argument than it has no parameter
  • It doesn't increments the global x, it provokes a new assignement of the global identifier x to a new object with incremented value.

EDIT 2

In this case, it isn't possible to use another name than x inside the function, otherwise the exemple would mean another thing.

def f():
    global x
    x += 1
x = 5
f()
print x

# f has no arguments

Why the hell did I write "I prefer to say that f has no argument than it has no parameter" to comment that ? I still wonder. At first, I had written "I prefer to say that f has no parameter than it has no argument" , thinking to the definition of f . I don't know why, I "corrected" by reversing the sentence and the result expresses nothing of what I think. I am completely puzzled.

Precisely, I think that the correct manners to express are :

  • in the definition of the function, f -> HAS no PARAMETER,

  • in the call f() , f -> RECEIVES no ARGUMENTS.

# Increments the global x

It doesn't increments the global x, it provokes a new assignement of the global identifier x to a new object with incremented value.

End of EDIT 2

.

It may seem minor nuances , and I am sure that it is a way to express things in a condensed manner.

But for me it is very important because, when a newbie, I had a lot of difficulty because of this kind of imprecision to understand all these questions linked to the peculiar data model of Python that are badly explained in the official docs of Python and that are debated in awkard discussions, such as the one concerning "pass by value or pass by reference" for exemple (that has no sense in Python), in which the terms are floating from right to left and left to right like on a sea of vagueness.

share|improve this answer
    
As much as I like to nitpick myself, this is really stretching it. The argument vs parameter distinction is well-defined (argument is what's passed for a call, parameter is the list of names that get passed), so in the second case you are less accurate and in the first your statement is, strictly speaking, one about the calling code and only correct at that if the sole parameter is in fact the callee's variable x. Pointing out immutability of ints is correct and useful though. (and you might want to to fix the examples for your own use if you're going to wisecrack ^^). –  delnan Apr 25 '11 at 10:06
    
@delnan You are right, my comments are poorly written, then they can be misunderstood and even confusionning, that takes the cake ! One of the reasons is that for each case, I didn't precise if I was saying something about the part of the code defining the function or about the following part of the code that processes an execution using the defined function. I edited my post, and I hope it will be now clear. –  eyquem Apr 25 '11 at 16:29
    
@delnan For the first case, I agree with you, my comment concerns the part of the code containing the call, not the definition of the function. But I don't understand when you write "only correct at that if the sole parameter is in fact the callee's variable x" –  eyquem Apr 25 '11 at 16:29
    
@delnan In fact, in such an example (case 1) and discussion, to make things clear, the parameter shouldn't be named with the name of the object passed as argument. In real code, some parameters have the same names as objects that are passed as arguments, but every informed coder knows that these names have different meaning according to their place in the code. –  eyquem Apr 25 '11 at 16:31
    
@delnan Concerning the second case, I was stunned to read what I had finally written. I don't remind what was my idea at the moment I wrote, or rather at the moment I changed what I had written before, which was exactly the sentence reversed. It is incomprehensible –  eyquem Apr 25 '11 at 16:36
show 2 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.