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Consider the following two classes:

class Base  
{  
  Base(const Base& other) {...} // relatively expensive operations here...
  Base(int i)             {...} // ...here,
  virtual ~Base()         {...} // ...and here
  ...
};

class Derived : public Base
{
  ...
  Derived(const Base& other)   :Base(other) {...} // some typechecking in here 
  virtual ~Derived() {}
  ...
};

This means Base can be "upcast" by means of the second constructor of Derived. Now consider the following code:

Base getBase()  
{
   int id = ...
   return Base(id);
}
...
int main()
{
   Base    b = getBase();   // CASE 1
   Derived d1(b);           // "upcast"

   Derived d2 = getBase();  // CASE 2
   ...
}

I am using VS2008 with optimizations turned on (/Ox /Ob2 /Oi /Ot). I checked calls to constructors and destructors on the console-output:

In Case 1 return value optimization works. There are two calls to:

  1. Base(int)
  2. ~Base()

However, there is nothing to be won here, when a Derived-object is needed in main. The "upcast" requires another constructor/destructor pair.

In Case 2 return value optimization does not work. Two objects are created and destroyed here:

  1. Base(int) //Create temporary
  2. ~Base() //Destroy temporary
  3. Base(const Base&) //via Derived(const Base&)
  4. ~Base() //via ~Derived()

Now it seems to me, that I have three conflicting requirements:

  1. I'd like to avoid the overhead of creating the temporary object (because object creation and destruction is rather expensive in class Base)
  2. In main, I need a Derived-object instead of a Base-object to work with.

Obviously, there's no free lunch here. But I might have missed something. So my question is: Is there a way to combine these requirements? Or has anyone had similar experiences?

Sidenote: I am aware of the fact, that the "upcast" Derived(const Base& other) might fail during runtime (this has been taken care of). Since the code is ok on syntactic level, I'd guess this not the reason for the compiler to avoid RVO.

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RVO refers to the elimination of the copy "needed" by the return statement inside the function when creating the return value. If the return value is used as an initializer for an object then the return value may be copied into the declared object or this copy may be eliminated and the object initialized directly with the return value of the function. This second copy is not the return value optimization and I think that it is this copy that you are referring to. –  Charles Bailey Apr 24 '11 at 14:55
    
So in case 1 there's no call to the copy ctor of Base? I don't think that's legal - b and d1 are separate objects, and the base class sub-object of d1 needs to be constructed from b. Copy-constructor elision only allows the elision of temporaries, not of variables. [Edit: oh, hang on, you mean there is one but you haven't listed it? "requires another ctor/dtor pair". I'd say that RVO is working, but as you've seen it doesn't do what you want.] –  Steve Jessop Apr 24 '11 at 15:24
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is bad.

Derived(const Base& other)   :Base(other) {...}

The static type of other can belong to the derived type. In that case it will get sliced. On top of that base class would be copied anyway.

RVO is about bypassing copy constructor and initialising the returned object in-place. If you need an object of the derived type you would have to to construct it first. RVO can't construct it for you.

Instead of Derived(const Base& other) you may want to consider different approach. How about this:

class Base  
{
  ...
  // extract expensive parts of another instance
  virtual void initialise(Base& b);
  ...
};

class Derived : public Base
{
  ...
  Derived(); // cheap constructor
  void initialise(Base& b) { /* implementation goes here */  }
  ...
};

initialise(Base& b) method would extract expensive parts from the argument. It can be destructive. Base will provide public (or maybe protected) interface to do the actual extraction.

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How about adding a constructor to Derived?

Derived(Base (*f)(void)) : Base(f()) { ... }

Then Derived d3 = getBase; might get you the optimization you want. Probably not very practical as it is, since I've had to specify the empty parameter list of f in Derived, which is quite limiting. But make it a template constructor and you can use a user-written functor, the result of a boost:bind or a C++0x lambda where available.

Failing that, extract the id = ... part of getBase into a function getId, and give Derived a constructor taking int that passes the id on to its Base sub-object. No doubt the real code is more complex than this, though, and that might result in hauling a lot of parameters about the place. Maybe a lightweight BaseParameters class, which you use in place of Base until the point where you actually need the slow work done, and then convert that to Base, Derived, or another related class.

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Sounds interesting. I'm going to try this out to see the effects. Yet this would introduce a coupling between the 'Derived' class and the function 'getBase()' (which actually represents a number of similar functions), which I would like to avoid. –  osterhase Apr 25 '11 at 9:48
    
@osterhase: depends how you do it. If all the arguments to getBase are captured by bind or lambda, then Derived is still only coupled by interface to Base, not getBase. Any no-arg function returning Base will do, and that's enough to insulate Derived from the details of what function the caller chooses to pass, and how it works. It's a dependency injection, that happens to only be used once and only in the initializer list. –  Steve Jessop Apr 25 '11 at 12:05
    
But since it's conceived as a way to hopefully get the optimization, rather than as a necessary part of the desired interface, obviously there's a chance it will be unpleasant in some respect... –  Steve Jessop Apr 25 '11 at 12:09
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