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I want to expose the following class as a web service.

import cern.colt.matrix.impl.DenseDoubleMatrix2D;

public class MatrixAlgebraImpl implements MatrixAlgebra{

    public DenseDoubleMatrix2D echo(DenseDoubleMatrix2D matrix) {
        return matrix;
    }
}

However DenseDoubleMatrix2D does not have a default constructor and its a third party library so I can't apply any annotations.

http://acs.lbl.gov/software/colt/api/cern/colt/matrix/impl/DenseDoubleMatrix2D.html

Ideally I would prefer not to annotate any code and have been looking to do this with CXF and Aegis. But any solution will do.

share|improve this question

Make your own class that inherits from DenseDoubleMatrix2D and has a default constructor. Or use JAX-B and read http://weblogs.java.net/blog/kohsuke/archive/2005/09/using_jaxb_20s.html. CXF also supports JAX-B.

share|improve this answer
    
This approach will work. However I have a fairly large codebase using colt and I would rather not sub-class every colt matrix type or wrap every end point with an adapter. Is there any other way of achieving the goal of exposing this class with any web service framework and without using annotations. – figopi Apr 29 '11 at 20:48
    
I doubt it. Those objects have to get constructed somehow. If there's no 'no-args' constructor, someone has to specify what to do. That's one bit of spec per class. You could submit a patch to the copy of colt that has become mahout-collections to add no-args constructors ... – bmargulies Apr 29 '11 at 21:25
    
Thanks for the answer, however the colt matrix library is not a part of mahout-collections. – figopi Apr 30 '11 at 0:04
    
True, it's in mahout-math. – bmargulies Apr 30 '11 at 0:45

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