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I programmed in C++ for many years and I still have doubt about one thing. In many places in other people code I see something like:

void Classx::memberfunction()
{
    this->doSomething();
}

If I need to import/use that code, I simply remove the this-> part, and I have never seen anything broken or having some side-effects.

void Classx::memberfunction()
{
    doSomething();
}

So, do you know of any reason to use such construct?

EDIT: Please note that I'm talking about member functions here, not variables. I understand it can be used when you want to make a distinction between a member variable and function parameter.

EDIT: apparent duplicate: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/333291/are-there-any-reasons-not-to-use-this-self-me

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16 Answers 16

up vote 5 down vote accepted

To guarantee you trigger compiler errors if there is a macro that might be defined with the same name as your member function and you're not certain if it has been reliably undefined.

No kidding, I'm pretty sure I've had to do exactly this for that reason!

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Nobody seems to be mentioning that another way of resolving member names is by using the en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scope_resolution_operator. E.g. Classx::doSomething(); –  Rehno Lindeque Dec 2 '09 at 11:57
4  
If applied to a function it has the effect of guaranteeing which version of a possibly virtual function is invoked, preventing polymorphism and commonly used to call a parent of an overriden function. It is NOT a safe equivalent of this->doSomething(). –  Andy Dent Dec 3 '09 at 11:30
    
That's true, I'd forgotten about this case! Thanks Andy. –  Rehno Lindeque Dec 3 '09 at 14:23

The only place where it really makes a difference is in templates in derived classes:

template<typename T>
class A {
protected:
  T x;
};

template<typename T>
class B : A<T> {
public:
  T get() {
    return this->x;
  }
};

Due to details in the name lookup in C++ compilers, it has to be made explicitly clear that x is a (inherited) member of the class, most easily done with this->x. But this is a rather esoteric case, if you don't have templated class hierarchies you don't really need to explicitly use this to access members of a class.

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If there is another variable in the same scope with the same name, the this-> will remove the ambiguity.

void Bar::setFoo(int foo)
{
    this->foo = foo;
}

Also it makes it clear that you're refering to a member variable / function.

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Using it like this makes it a band-aid for a bad naming convention, in my opinion. It clutters up the code needlessly. –  Joris Timmermans Feb 23 '09 at 11:12
1  
Just answering the question. –  drby Feb 23 '09 at 11:14
    
I did not ask a question about variables, that is a known issue. I asked about member functions. –  Milan Babuškov Feb 23 '09 at 11:33
1  
@MadKeithV: this-> is a language-and-tool-supported naming convention, unlike for instance m_ prefix. –  MSalters Feb 23 '09 at 11:38
    
And it still does not make it clear what's the scope of foo on RHS. –  Milan Babuškov Feb 25 '10 at 22:27

I can think of readability like when you use additional parenthesis to make things clear.

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I think it is mainly as an aid to the reader. It makes it explicit that what is being called is a method on the object, and not an ordinary function. When reading code, it can be helpful to know that the called function can change fields in the current object, for instance.

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As "code reason", to distinguish a local parameter or value (that takes precedence) from a member:

class Foo
{
    int member;
    void SetMember(int member)
    {
       this->member = member;
    }
}

However, that's bad practive to begin with, and usually can be solved locally.

The second reason is more "environment": it sometimes helps Intellisense to filter what I am really looking for. However, I also thing when I use this to find the member I am looking for I should also remove this.

So yes, there are good reasons, but they are all temporary (and bad on the long run).

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2  
I disagree that this is necessarily a bad practice. If you have a good, clear, and umbiguous name for an object or variable... why change it? –  TK. Feb 23 '09 at 11:14
    
IMO coding standard should make public properties vs. internal members vs. local variables/parameters unambigous. As much as i hate typing m_, there is a good reason for it. –  peterchen Feb 23 '09 at 11:31
    
To clarify: I think it's ok when it happens, but when it happens often, you likely have a readability problem and an invitation to attention slip bugs. Now, your standard might declare 'this->' to be used always as 'the distinguisher', but I don't think that's a good choice. –  peterchen Feb 23 '09 at 11:59

This has been asked a couple of times, but it's hard to search for it because "this" seems to be stop word for the search.

Here's my own question: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/333291/are-there-any-reasons-not-to-use-this-self-me

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This is done to be explicit about the fact that the variable being used is a member variable as opposed to a local or global variable. It's not necessary in most cases, but being explicit about the scope could be helpful if you've trumped the variable with a declaration of the same name in a tighter scope.

At companies I've worked at, we just prepended "m_" to member variables. It can be helpful sometimes, and I much prefer it to using "this->".

Edit: Adding a link to the GCC docs, which explain a case where using this-> is necessary to get a non-dependent lookup to work correctly.

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I don't think it makes a difference to the compiler, but I always write this-> because I believe it makes the code self-documenting.

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Disambiguation: in case you have another similar naming function/variable in the same namespace? I've never seen usage for any other reason.

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It's your own choice. I find it more clear when you use this. But if you don't like it, you can ommit it.

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I prefer it without the explicit this pointer as well. For method calls it doesn't add a lot of value, but it helps distinguish local variables from member variables.

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I can't quite remember the exact circumstances, but I've seen (very rare) instances where I had to write "this->membername" to successfully compile the code with GCC. All that I remember is that it was not in relation to ambiguity and therefore took me a while to figure out the solution. The same code compiled fine without using this-> in Visual Studio.

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It has to do with dependent template parameters, this link gives a good explanation: gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc/Name-lookup.html –  Dan Olson Feb 24 '09 at 19:57

This is really a matter of style and applies to many other languages such as Java and C#. Some people prefer to see the explicit this (or self, or Me, or whatever) and others do not. Just go with whatever is in your style guidelines, and if it's your project, you get to decide the guidelines.

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And some languages (PHP, Python) even enforce it. One of the reasons I hate doing OO in them. –  Milan Babuškov Feb 24 '09 at 7:02

I will use it to call operators implicitly (the return and parameter types below are just dummies for making up the code).

struct F {
  void operator[](int); 
  void operator()();

  void f() {
    (*this)[n];
    (*this)();
  }

  void g() {
    operator[](n);
    operator()();
  }
};

I do like the *this syntax more. It has a slightly different semantic, in that using *this will not hide non-member operator functions with the same name as a member, though.

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What do you mean "*this will not hide non-member operator functions with the same name as a member"? Can you provide an example? –  rlbond Dec 9 '09 at 22:29
    
Example: struct A { void operator*(); void f(); }; void operator*(A, A); void A::f() { A a; operator*(a, a); } <- this is ill-formed, as the member operator* hides the global operator*. But if you write a * a (the expression syntax), it will work fine, as lookup will be separate for members and nonmembers. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Dec 9 '09 at 22:41
    
(The Standard shows a better example at 13.3.1.2/10). –  Johannes Schaub - litb Dec 9 '09 at 22:44

There are many good answers, but none of them mention that using this-> in source code makes it easier to read, especially when you are reading a code of some long function, but even a short function, imagine a code:

bool Class::Foo()
{
    return SomeValue;
}

from looking on this code, you can't clearly know what SomeValue is. It could be even some #define, or static variable, but if you write

bool Class::Foo()
{
    return this->SomeValue;
}

you clearly know that SomeValue is a non-static member variable of the same class.

So it doesn't just help you to ensure that name of your functions or variables wouldn't conflict with some other names, but it also makes it easier for others to read and understand the source code, writing a self documenting source code is sometimes very important as well.

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