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In Ruby, is there a way to do something like

class Foo
    attr_reader :var_name :reader_name #This won't work, of course
    def initialize
        @var_name = 0
    end
end

# stuff here ....

def my_method
    foo = Foo.new
    assert_equal 0,foo.reader_name
end

In other words, is there a standard way to make an accessor method for a variable that uses a different name than the variable. (Besides hand-coding it, of course.)

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1  
Why would you want to do that? It's probably bad practice. –  edgerunner Apr 24 '11 at 19:07
1  
When your internal names are different than the external interface specification. This came up working on the about_dice_project ruby-koan. They want to call the list of rolled dice formed most recently values. I want to call it @lastRolled. One refers to the way it is implemented (as an internal variable should) and the other refers to the way the specifier was thinking about it. In this case it doesn't matter a bit, but I could see it being something I might want to know in the future. –  Eponymous Apr 24 '11 at 19:45
    
upvote for well written Q. I don't have to like what your asking ;) –  oma Apr 24 '11 at 21:03

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could use alias_method:

class Foo
    attr_reader :var_name
    alias_method :reader_name, :var_name
    def initialize
        @var_name = 0
    end
end

The var_name method built by attr_reader would still be available though. You could use remove_method to get rid of the var_name method if you really wanted to (but make sure you get everything in the right order):

class Foo
    attr_reader :var_name
    alias_method :reader_name, :var_name
    remove_method :var_name
    def initialize
        @var_name = 0
    end
end

If you really wanted to, you could monkey patch an attr_reader_as method into Module:

class Module
    def attr_reader_as(attr_name, alias_name)
        attr_reader attr_name
        alias_method alias_name, attr_name
        remove_method attr_name
    end
end

class Foo
    attr_reader_as :var_name, :reader_name
    def initialize
        @var_name = 0
    end
end

A better attr_reader_as would take a hash (e.g. {:var_name => :reader_name, :var_name2 => :reader_name2}) but I'll leave that as an exercise for the reader.

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You can't pass any options to attr_reader

Is this a handcoding?

class Foo
  def initialize
      @var_name = 0
  end
  def reader_name; @var_name; end
end
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1  
+1 for "don't be so lazy and do it yourself". Sorry for wrecking your cool and lucky 8888 reputation. –  mu is too short Apr 24 '11 at 19:15
    
Yes, it is a hand-coding. But your response lets me know that it is likely most ruby programmers would do it that way. Laziness is a virtue of course. –  Eponymous Apr 24 '11 at 19:54

First off, my mantra: A good programmer plays his teammates good. Following conventions is playing others good.

What you want seems unconventional, and as @edgerunner states, bad practice (read: I would've smacked you). All I'm saying, think twice about this, I don't know your use case, it might prove valid... Anyway, a little fun during easter should be allowed, so I practiced some metaprogramming and played with Mixins.

class Foo
  include MyAttrReader
  my_attr_reader :var_name, :reader_name
  def initialize
    @var_name = 0
  end
end

pretty clean. The module does the trick (be sure to load this module before the class)

module MyAttrReader
  def self.included(base)
    base.extend ClassMethods
  end

  module ClassMethods
    def my_attr_reader(attribute, read_attribute)
      define_method "#{read_attribute}" do
        instance_variable_get "@#{attribute}"
      end
    end
  end
end

Testing in irb

ruby-1.9.2-p180 :001 > load 'my_attr_reader.rb'
 => true 
ruby-1.9.2-p180 :002 > load 'foo.rb'
 => true 
ruby-1.9.2-p180 :003 > f = Foo.new
 => #<Foo:0x00000100979658 @var_name=0> 
ruby-1.9.2-p180 :004 > f.reader_name
 => 0 
ruby-1.9.2-p180 :005 > f.var_name
NoMethodError: undefined method `var_name' for #<Foo:0x00000100979658 @var_name=0>

I hope you see how unintuitive this will be for others. You could override the to_s method to show how to access @var_name, but I wouldn't go there... or define the var_name method too (two getter-methods). Stick to conventions. Anyhow, I had great fun, good luck!

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