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CoffeeScript list comprehensions are slightly different from Pythons... which of these is the way that people like to return list comprehensions?

return elem+1 for elem in [1,2,3] # returns 3+1
return [elem+1 for elem in [1,2,3]].pop() # returns [2,3,4]
return (elem+1 for elem in [1,2,3]) # returns [2,3,4]

In Python, I would just write:

return [elem+1 for elem in [1,2,3]]

And it returns the list correctly, instead of a list of lists, as this would do in CoffeeScript.

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up vote 9 down vote accepted

Which of these is the way that people like to return list comprehensions?

return elem+1 for elem in [1,2,3] # returns 3+1
return [elem+1 for elem in [1,2,3]].pop() # returns [2,3,4]
return (elem+1 for elem in [1,2,3]) # returns [2,3,4]

Well, of the three options, certainly #3. But the best stylistic choice is actually this:

elem+1 for elem in [1,2,3] # returns [2,3,4]

As the last line of a function, any expression expr is equivalent to return (expr). The return keyword is very rarely necessary.

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Note you can't assign using this, i.e. someVar = elem+1 for elem in [1,2,3] gets a value of 4. Annoyingly, though understandably, you still have to put the list comprehension in parenthesis like: someVar = (elem+1 for elem in [1,2,3]) – AJP May 11 '13 at 22:21

I've never used CoffeeScript, but if my options were getting the wrong result, doing a silly [...].pop() kludge or just using a set of parenthesis, I'd go for the parenthesis.

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I have used CoffeeScript, and this is indeed essentially correct. :) But see my answer for further elaboration. – Trevor Burnham Apr 24 '11 at 21:42

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