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We have a clustered database with two nodes. My objective is to find out the size of the database. Could you please give me a script to estimate the size of the database?

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4 Answers 4

A good script is go to the dba, give a few beers and you will get what you want. If that does not help, check the v$datafile, v$tempfile and v$log views. They will give you all needed data, if you have access to them, in which case you probably are the dba.

select sum(bytes)/1024/1024 MB from
( select sum (bytes) bytes from v$datafile
  union
  select sum (bytes) from v$tempfile
  union
  select sum (bytes * members) from v$log
)
/

I hope this helps.

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Thanks for your response.So,the size of the database would be= size of datafile+tempfile+log file on node 1+ size of datafile+tempfile+log file on node2. Am I right? –  user722902 Apr 25 '11 at 1:00
    
Close but not right. In a cluster database each instance has it's own undo tablespace and it's own redolog groups. They are all counted in the query I listed above. If you also want to know about the size of the archives, yes, they are created for each instance. See v$archive_log for that info. –  ik_zelf Apr 25 '11 at 7:35
    
I am ready to offer a few beers to my ACE-DBA who is answering my queries with patience. Can you share the good script, please? –  user722902 Apr 25 '11 at 11:40
    
@user722902, Richard, I think I gave a very good script already. You need some privileges in the database to execute them, that is true, I can not help that. What exactly are you missing? The archived log files could be added for the total sum but they have only a temporary value. As always, I am willing to help and at the moment a bit thirsty. ;-) –  ik_zelf Apr 25 '11 at 13:32
    
I would appreciate your service to Oracle community.Much impressed with your answers. –  user722902 Apr 26 '11 at 16:55
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select a.data_size+b.temp_size+c.redo_size+d.controlfile_size "total_size in GB"
from ( select sum(bytes)/1024/1024/1024 data_size
from dba_data_files) a,
( select nvl(sum(bytes),0)/1024/1024/1024 temp_size
from dba_temp_files ) b,
( select sum(bytes)/1024/1024/1024 redo_size
from sys.v_$log ) c,
( select sum(BLOCK_SIZE*FILE_SIZE_BLKS)/1024/1024/1024 controlfile_size
from v$controlfile) d
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Use the code below to get DB size. Yes its the same as above but you can put it in a nice PL/SQL script to run in different databases.

SET SERVEROUTPUT ON
Declare

  ddf Number:= 0;
  dtf Number:= 0;
  log_bytes Number:= 0;
  total Number:= 0;

BEGIN
  select sum(bytes)/power(1024,3) into ddf from dba_data_files;
  select sum(bytes)/power(1024,3) into dtf from dba_temp_files;
  select sum(bytes)/power(1024,3) into log_bytes from v$log;

  total:= round(ddf+dtf+log_bytes, 3);
  dbms_output.put_line('TOTAL DB Size is: '||total||'GB ');
END;

/

http://techxploration.blogspot.com.au/2012/06/script-to-get-oracle-database-size.html

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It's not quite the same: ik_zelf has bytes * members for the v$log size. (I'm not qualified to say which one's correct.) –  Rup Apr 22 '13 at 15:54
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A slight modification to Jaun's query to include members from v$log as was pointed out and this would probably be the most accurate because it includes the controle file info which is part of the overall database size.

select a.data_size+b.temp_size+c.redo_size+d.controlfile_size "total_size in GB"
from ( select sum(bytes)/1024/1024/1024 data_size
from dba_data_files) a,
( select nvl(sum(bytes),0)/1024/1024/1024 temp_size
from dba_temp_files ) b,
( select sum(bytes*members)/1024/1024/1024 redo_size
from sys.v_$log ) c,
( select sum(BLOCK_SIZE*FILE_SIZE_BLKS)/1024/1024/1024 controlfile_size
from v$controlfile) d
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