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I don't understand why the following doesn't work:

def foo( x ):
    n = 1
    summe = 0
    def bar():
        n -= 1
    for i in range(0,10):
        y = x+i+n
        x += i
        summe += y
        print "{0} = {1} + {2} + {3}".format(y,x,i,n)
        bar()
    print "summe =", summe
    return summe

Why is it that bar() doesn't inherit the scope of foo()? Is this a C'ism that I need to forget? Is there a way I can make that work?

share|improve this question
1  
What version of Python are you using? – Gabe Apr 24 '11 at 20:16
    
Version 2.6.6. Is this addressed in a newer version? – supercheetah Apr 24 '11 at 20:51
1  
It cannot be a C-ism - in C a function cannot have "inner functions". – glglgl Aug 17 '14 at 8:00
    
BTW, I hope it is just an example. It is completely pointless to use this function instead of just doing n -= 1 where it is needed... – glglgl Aug 17 '14 at 8:04
1  
@supercheetah Here it is described as a GCC extension. In Standard C it is not valid. – glglgl Aug 18 '14 at 6:02
up vote 14 down vote accepted

PEP 3104 provides an explanation and a solution for this problem. The issue is Python treats any assignment to a name as a local variable declaration.

>>> n = 1
>>> def bar():
>>>     n = n + 1
>>> 
>>> bar()
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<pyshell#8>", line 1, in <module>
    bar()
  File "<pyshell#7>", line 2, in bar
    n = n + 1
UnboundLocalError: local variable 'n' referenced before assignment

There is a few workarounds for this problem if you use a Python version without the nonlocal keyword. One ugly trick is to wrap your variable in a list:

>>> n=[1]
>>> def bar():
>>>     n[0] = n[0] + 1
>>> 
>>> bar()
>>> n
[2]

Although this trick works, it is usually better to rewrite the code to remove the need for non-local assignments.

share|improve this answer
    
That is ugly, but at least it works. There are some things in which having access to the nonlocal variable would be useful, such as in a for loop with a bunch of elifs for some kind of reset function. I've used some lambdas to work around the problem, but they're limited in their functionality. – supercheetah Apr 24 '11 at 20:50
    
Why does it works when the variable is a list ? – wap26 Nov 28 '13 at 4:28
    
Because you can use subscript assignment, which does not declare a new variable in the local context. – Alexandre Vassalotti Dec 9 '13 at 21:11

I actually found this question while searching for a solution to a slightly different problem. Local variables aren't inherited by sub's inherited but there's nothing stopping you from passing the variable to the inner function and then assigning the results on return.

This is in addition to the nonlocal statement in PEP 3104. It's slightly less ugly and makes memorizing yet another python keyword less crucial.

    def foo( x ):
        n = 1
        summe = 0
        def bar(n):
            n -= 1
            return n
        for i in range(0,10):
            n = bar(n)
            y = x+i+n
            x += i
            summe += y
            print "{0} = {1} + {2} + {3}".format(y,x,i,n)
        print "summe =", summe
        return summe
share|improve this answer
    
There's no point in passing summe to bar(). Besides, your bar() returns None, and it is not about modifying summe, but n. – glglgl Aug 17 '14 at 8:02
    
I was paraphrasing. The point was to find a hack to simulate scope inheritance. – keegan2149 Aug 17 '14 at 16:23

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