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If I had a list of integers separated by a space on one line (eg: 50 34 1 3423 5 345) then what would be the best way of making each of them a separate integer variable - collecting the list of integers with cin?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

In follow-up to sehe's answer, here's how you'd do it a little more verbosely (ahem).

The algorithms sehe used basically do this internally. This answer is included mostly for clarity.

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

int main()
{
   std::vector<int> myInts;

   int tmp;
   while (std::cin >> tmp) {
      myInts.push_back(tmp);
   }

   // Now `myInts` is a vector containing all the integers
}

Live example.

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+1 Hehe. Thanks for picking up on my work to explain the awkward STL-ese :) I suppose in practice, I'd actually advise this. Although, yes I do prefer the algorithm variant of doing things for slightly purist reasons. –  sehe Apr 24 '11 at 20:36
    
+1 for answer is included mostly for clarity. –  Nawaz Apr 24 '11 at 20:40
    
+1 for the live example -- very helpful. –  Pete Wilson Apr 24 '11 at 20:49
    
I don't understand - how does this work if I enter all of the integers on one line? –  pighead10 Apr 24 '11 at 21:07
    
@PigHead: Lines are irrelevant. >> reads as many characters as it can whilst they are valid for an int, then it stops. It also tends to ignore whitespace, so it'll be immediately ready to extract the next numeric-looking substring. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Apr 24 '11 at 21:08
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <iterator>

std::vector<int> ints;
std::copy(std::istream_iterator<int>(cin), 
      std::istream_iterator<int>(), 
      std::back_inserter(ints));

Done. If you really need to explicetely read line-wise:

#include <sstream>
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <iterator>

std::string singleline;
std::istringstream iss; // out of loop for performance
while (std::getline(cin, singleline))
{
      iss.str(singleline);
      std::copy(std::istream_iterator<int>(iss), 
            std::istream_iterator<int>(), 
            std::back_inserter(ints));
}

An istream_iterator<int> will repeatedly apply operator>>(int&) to the referenced stream (until the end of the stream). By default this will silently ignore whitespace, and it will throw an exception if the input operation failed (e.g. non-integer input is encountered)

The back_inserter is an output iterator that you can use with all container types (like vector) that support the .push_back operation. So in fact what is written there in STL algorithmese is similar to

std::vector<int> ints;
while (iss>>myint)
{
     ints.push_back(myint);
}
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Thanks - care to explain what... any of that does? –  pighead10 Apr 24 '11 at 20:30
    
Sure, check back in a minute –  sehe Apr 24 '11 at 20:31
    
@sehe - Don't you think this answer is juuuuust a little too basic for the OP? –  Pete Wilson Apr 24 '11 at 20:31
4  
@Pete I disagree. This is exactly the type of code that should be used by beginners. The less of own code a beginner writes, the better. –  Let_Me_Be Apr 24 '11 at 20:33
    
@Pete: i tend to publish the core of an answer, and then take some time to embellish, often depending on the OP feedback –  sehe Apr 24 '11 at 20:35

Have a look at the man pages for strtok( ) and atoi( )

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1  
Ew. It's the 21st century now, buddy. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Apr 24 '11 at 20:31
    
@Tomalak Geret'kal - I'm holding on to my investments in buggy whips, by God! –  Pete Wilson Apr 24 '11 at 20:38
    
Why the homework tag? –  pighead10 Apr 24 '11 at 21:11

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