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I am developing a simple game in c++, a chase-the-dot style one, where you must click a drawn circle on the display and then it jumps to another random location with every click, but I want to make the game end after 60 seconds or so, write the score to a text file and then upon launching the program read from the text file and store the information into an array and somehow rearrange it to create a high score table. I think I can figure out the high score and mouse clicking in a certain area myself, but I am completely stuck with creating a possible timer. Any help appreciated, cheers!

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3  
I suppose this would be the type of question to mention the platform with. A clock is a hardware feature, and accessing it is platform and library-dependent. E.g. linux, Win32? SDL, console? etc –  sehe Apr 24 '11 at 20:39

4 Answers 4

In C++11 there is easy access to timers. For example:

#include <chrono>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    std::cout << "begin\n";
    std::chrono::steady_clock::time_point tend = std::chrono::steady_clock::now()
                                               + std::chrono::minutes(1);
    while (std::chrono::steady_clock::now() < tend)
    {
        // do your game
    }
    std::cout << "end\n";
}

Your platform may or may not support <chrono> yet. There is a boost implementation of <chrono>.

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re the other question about literal operators: I initially thought that operator "" _Foo is fine, but it now appears to me the use of "name" in the library in section 17.6.4.3 appears to include macros? (as opposed to the core definition of "name" at 3p4). It starts with "The C++ standard library reserves the following kinds of names: ... macros, ...". That would seem to limit the user to lower-case/numeric literal suffixes after the underscore, because some random macro might replace a _Foo to something random. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Apr 25 '11 at 15:13
    
Agreed. And they can have only one leading underscore. It is really a shame we don't have some kind of scoping for macros. –  Howard Hinnant Apr 25 '11 at 18:01

Without reference to a particular framework or even the OS this is unanswerable.

In SDL there is SDL_GetTicks() which suits the purpose.

On linux, there is the general purpose clock_gettime or gettimeofday that should work pretty much everywhere (but beware of the details).

Win32 API has several function calls related to this, including Timer callback mechanisms, such as GetTickCount, Timers etc. (article)

Using timers is usually closely related to the meme of 'idle' processing. So you'd want to search for that topic as well (and this is where the message pump comes in, because the message pump decides when (e.g.) WM_IDLE messages get sent; Gtk has a similar concept of Idle hooks and I reckon pretty much every UI framework does)

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Usually GUI program has so called "message pump" loop. Check of that timer should be a part of your loop:

while(running)
{
  if( current_time() > end_time )
  {
    // time is over ...
    break;
  }
  if( next_ui_message(msg) )
    dispatch(msg); 
}
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5  
Probably not. You should probably create a timer via your OS/framework and have it send you events. –  nbt Apr 24 '11 at 21:23
    
To unapersson: if you know OS/framework then - "yes", you can use OS primitives for that. In the way question was formulated I believe my answer is sufficient. In SDL for example this is the way how they do [idle] timers there. –  c-smile Apr 24 '11 at 22:40
    
event polling would work with SDL, but GUI programs usually use callbacks instead. –  Bastien Léonard Apr 25 '11 at 0:11

Try this one out:

//Creating Digital Watch in C++
#include<iostream>
#include<Windows.h>
using namespace std;

struct time{

int hr,min,sec;
};
int main()
{
time a;
a.hr = 0;
a.min = 0;
a.sec = 0;

for(int i = 0; i<24; i++)
{
    if(a.hr == 23)
    {
        a.hr = 0;
    }

    for(int j = 0; j<60; j++)
    {
        if(a.min == 59)
        {
            a.min = 0;
        }

        for(int k = 0; k<60; k++)
        {
            if(a.sec == 59)
            {
                a.sec = 0;
            }

            cout<<a.hr<<" : "<<a.min<<" : "<<a.sec<<endl;
            a.sec++;
            Sleep(1000);
            system("Cls");
        }
    a.min++;

}

    a.hr++;
}

}
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