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I have such a function:

function get_title($keyword) {

    $titles = array(
        'p1'   => 'Title 1',
        'p2'   => 'Title 2',
        // ... other data
        'pm'   => 'Some other title',
        'pn'   => 'One more title'
    );

    return $titles[$keyword];
}

Is it good practice to keep such an array in local variable? For example it has about 50 titles. So every time I call this function - script loads 50 titles?

I'm thinking about using global but isn't global a bad practice?

I'm novice in PHP, early I've written in JS. In JS I can do this with closures:

var get_title = function() {

    var titles = {
        'p1': 'Title 1',
        'p2': 'Title 2',
        // ... other data
        'pm': 'Some other title',
        'pn': 'One more title'
    }

    return function(keyword) {
        return titles[keyword];
    }
}();

Here, title-array is not global, and it's not loading every time I call the function. But how to do this in PHP?

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Sounds like an appropiate question for codereview.stackexchange.com –  Wes Apr 24 '11 at 22:46

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Either:

$titles = array(
    'p1'   => 'Title 1',
    'p2'   => 'Title 2',
     // ... other data
    'pm'   => 'Some other title',
    'pn'   => 'One more title'
);

function get_title($keyword) {
    global $titles;
    return $titles[$keyword];
}
get_title('p1');

or

class Something {
    private static $titles = array(
        'p1'   => 'Title 1',
        'p2'   => 'Title 2',
         // ... other data
        'pm'   => 'Some other title',
        'pn'   => 'One more title'
    );

    public static function get_title($keyword) {
        return self::$titles[$keyword];
    }
}
Something::get_title('p1');

Using the static class here is a bit like closures in Javascript.

Unless memory is a problem, don't worry about it.

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Sounds like a global is appropriate here.

Try not to pay attention to people who say that "such-and-such is always 'evil'". Such generalisations are dangerous, as you're now finding out.

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Thanks, you've added () in my JS code. Yes, this is more comfortable, because in my example, after this function declaration I should call it in such way: var titles = get_title(); var title1 = titles('p1') –  Innuendo Apr 24 '11 at 23:07

Is $titles coming from a database? If not, this is really micro optimization and i can almost say that instantating that variable will never be a bottleneck worth optimizing.

However, if you really want, there is two simple solutions. The first one is indeed keeping a global variable. One issue with this is that anyone can modify your global array. Apart from that, this is not bad at all.

Another solution is to make a static class with $titles as private, static member. Then it's just a matter of creating a public method calling this array.

Theese solutions will only instantiate your array once.

Edit: Ah, Frits demonstrates exactly what I mean.

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I see no reason to create a function for this, except if you need to access the $title data from within other functions, in which case you'd be better off passing $title as a parameter to those other functions.

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You can very easily do what you want with a static variable:

function get_title($keyword) {

    static $titles = null;

    if($titles === null) {
        $titles = array(
            'p1'   => 'Title 1',
            'p2'   => 'Title 2',
            // ... other data
            'pm'   => 'Some other title',
            'pn'   => 'One more title'
        );
    }

    return $titles[$keyword];
}

The "initialize to null/check/set value" trick (instead of setting the value of $titles directly) allows you to use any code you like to initialize the variable (including non-constant expressions).

I would certainly prefer this over a global because it does a better job of hiding the details of how $titles is produced. The class static property is another way of doing exactly this; choosing between the two is IMHO a matter of style.

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Well in php function variables are local they are not visible to the outside world like in javascript. If you want to make the php var to act like a javascript var you will need to add global in front of the variable like this -> global $var; Now since you dont want to set the $titles every time you run the function you can declare it as static like this

function get_title($keyword) {

static $titles = array(
    'p1'   => 'Title 1',
    'p2'   => 'Title 2',
    // ... other data
    'pm'   => 'Some other title',
    'pn'   => 'One more title'
);

return $titles[$keyword];

}

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