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I have to pack and unpack a Cardinal into four one-byte fields (in Delphi 2010).

I'm doing this across all the pixels of a large image, so I need it to be fast!

Can anyone show me how to write these two functions? (The const and out keywords are just for clarity. If they interfere with inline assembly, then I can remove them.)

procedure FromCardinalToBytes( const aInput: Cardinal;
                               out   aByte1: Byte;
                               out   aByte2: Byte;
                               out   aByte3: Byte;
                               out   aByte4: Byte); inline;

function FromBytesToCardinal( const aByte1: Byte;
                              const aByte2: Byte;
                              const aByte3: Byte;
                              const aByte4: Byte):Cardinal; inline;
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what exactly do you want to do? Paste some code and maybe we can give you some fast assembler that can fix your need for speed. –  Johan Apr 25 '11 at 0:17
2  
I recommend you avoid inline assembly unless you absolutely have to. It will limit your portability unnecessarily (consider 64-bit Delphi is already in beta). You can actually do this without the functions. And as Johan points out, you can probably do whatever you're trying to achieve without even decomposing into individual bytes. –  Craig Young Apr 25 '11 at 0:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There are many ways. The simplest is

function FromBytesToCardinal(const AByte1, AByte2, AByte3,
  AByte4: byte): cardinal; inline;
begin
  result := AByte1 + (AByte2 shl 8) + (AByte3 shl 16) + (AByte4 shl 24);
end;

procedure FromCardinalToBytes(const AInput: cardinal; out AByte1,
  AByte2, AByte3, AByte4: byte); inline;
begin
  AByte1 := byte(AInput);
  AByte2 := byte(AInput shr 8);
  AByte3 := byte(AInput shr 16);
  AByte4 := byte(AInput shr 24);
end;

Slightly more sophisticated (but not necessarily faster) is

function FromBytesToCardinal2(const AByte1, AByte2, AByte3,
  AByte4: byte): cardinal; inline;
begin
  PByte(@result)^ := AByte1;
  PByte(NativeUInt(@result) + 1)^ := AByte2;
  PByte(NativeUInt(@result) + 2)^ := AByte3;
  PByte(NativeUInt(@result) + 3)^ := AByte4;
end;

procedure FromCardinalToBytes2(const AInput: cardinal; out AByte1,
  AByte2, AByte3, AByte4: byte); inline;
begin
  AByte1 := PByte(@AInput)^;
  AByte2 := PByte(NativeUInt(@AInput) + 1)^;
  AByte3 := PByte(NativeUInt(@AInput) + 2)^;
  AByte4 := PByte(NativeUInt(@AInput) + 3)^;
end;

If you don't need the bytes to be byte variables, you can do even trickier things, like declaring

type
  PCardinalRec = ^TCardinalRec;
  TCardinalRec = packed record
    Byte1,
    Byte2,
    Byte3,
    Byte4: byte;
  end;

and then just cast:

var
  c: cardinal;
begin
  c := $12345678;
  PCardinalRec(@c)^.Byte3 // get or set byte 3 in c
share|improve this answer
    
Nicely done, Andreas! You've upheld the great reputation you've earned. Thanks A LOT!! –  RobertFrank Apr 25 '11 at 0:00
    
function FromBytesToCardinal2(const AByte1, AByte2, AByte3, AByte4: byte): cardinal; inline; begin PByte(@result)^ := AByte1; PByte(NativeUInt(@result) + 1)^ := AByte2; PByte(NativeUInt(@result) + 2)^ := AByte3; PByte(NativeUInt(@result) + 3)^ := AByte4; end; Yikes 3 unaligned memory accesses. This will be very slow code indeed. –  Johan Apr 25 '11 at 0:50
    
SysUtils already declares some records to access "subvalues" of a variable. Check WordRec, LongRec, Int64Rec, TFloatRec. –  user160694 Apr 25 '11 at 18:07
    
Andreas: Just a quick note to thank you again. I've starting using this code and of course it works. I appreciate your having taken the time to post such a good response with such clear examples. –  RobertFrank Apr 27 '11 at 17:06
    
@Robert: Thank you very much. –  Andreas Rejbrand Apr 27 '11 at 17:07

I'd recommed not using a function, just use a variant record.

type
  TCardinalRec = packed record
    case Integer of
      0: (Value: Cardinal;);
      1: (Bytes: array[0..3] of Byte;);
    end;

Then you can easily use this to obtain the individual bytes.

var
  LPixel: TCardinalRec;
...
  LPixel.Value := 123455;
  //Then read each of the bytes using
  B1 := LPixel.Bytes[0];
  B2 := LPixel.Bytes[1];
  //etc.

If you absolutely must, you can put this into a function, but it's trivial enough not to bother with the overhead of a function call.


EDIT
To illustrate the efficiency of the variant record approach consider the following (assuming you're reading your image from a Stream).

var
  LPixelBuffer: array[0..1023] of TCardinalRec;
...

  ImageStream.Read(LPixelBuffer, SizeOf(LPixelBuffer));
  for I := Low(LPixelBuffer) to High(LPixelBuffer) do
  begin
    //Here each byte is accessible by:
    LPixelBuffer[I].Bytes[0]
    LPixelBuffer[I].Bytes[1]
    LPixelBuffer[I].Bytes[2]
    LPixelBuffer[I].Bytes[3]
  end;

PS: Instead of an arbitrarily generic Bytes array, you could explicitly name each Byte in the variant record as Red, Green, Blue, (and whatever the fourth Byte means).

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2  
Aren't they called VARIANT RECORDS? (not Variable, Variant) –  Warren P Apr 25 '11 at 0:44
    
@Warren yes, variant records –  Johan Apr 25 '11 at 0:51
    
Thanks for the correction - done. –  Craig Young Apr 25 '11 at 0:54
    
Such record is already defined as SysUtils.LongRec. –  user160694 Apr 25 '11 at 18:05

If you want fast you need to consider the 80x86 architecture.

The speed depends heavily on what you are doing with the bytes. The x86 can access the bottom 2 bytes really fast, using the AL and AH registers
(least significant bytes in the 32-bit EAX register)

If you want to get at the higher order two bytes, you do not want to access those directly. Because you'll get an unaligned memory access, wasting CPU-cycles and messing up with the cache.

Making it faster
All this stuff messing with individual bytes is really not needed. If you want to be really fast, work with 4 bytes at a time.

NewPixel:= OldPixel or $0f0f0f0f;

If you want to process your pixels really fast use inline MMX assembly and work with 8 bytes at a time.

Links:
Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MMX_%28instruction_set%29
Explanation of the MMX instruction set: http://webster.cs.ucr.edu/AoA/Windows/HTML/TheMMXInstructionSet.html

Or re-ask your question on SO: How do I do this bitmap manipulation ... in MMX.

Really really fast
If you want it really really fast, like 100 or 1000x faster than MMX can, your videocard can do that. Google for CUDA or GPGPU.

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