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Sorry if the question is not to clear, this is what im trying to do. I have an object, a delegate and a view controller.

Object pseudo-code

@interface Car: NSObject {
    UIColor *color;
}
@property (assign)UIColor *color;
- (void) setColor(UIColor col);
@end

@implementation Car
@synthetize color;
// i know that synthesize makes this function redundant. 
// I just used it to demonstrate
// the need to access an instance method.
- (void) setColor(UIColor col)
{
    color = col;
}
@end

delegate code

@interface myDelegate: UIApplicationDelegate {
    Car *car;
    UIViewController *theView;
}
@property (assign)Car *car;
@end

@implementation myDelegate
@synthesize car;
- (BOOL)application:(UIApplication *)application didFinishLaunchingWithOptions:(NSDictionary *)launchOptions 
{    
    theView = [[MyViewController alloc]init];   

    return YES;
}

@end

View pseudo Code

@interface MyViewController: UIViewController {

    MyDelegate *appDelegate;
}
@property (retain) MyDelegate *appDelegate;
@end

@implementation MyViewController
@synthesize appDelegate;

- (void)viewDidLoad {
    self.appDelegate = (MyDelegate*)[[UIApplication sharedApplication] delegate];
    /// THIS IS MY ISSUSE!
    [self.appDelegate.car setColor(UIColor);
}
@end

Can anyone explain or point me to where i can understand why [self.appDelegate.car setColor()] gives me a compile error that reads "Unknown component setColor of a property".

Im sure there is a way to do this in objective C as i would do it in python, java or other OO language.

Any help would be greatly appreciated

Cheers Rudy

share|improve this question
1  
The error message you’re getting is clearly a result of actual code failing to compile. Please take the time to post as much of your actual code as you can, including #import statements etc. It’s going to be hard to tell you why you get that error if all we have to work with is pseudo-code. ;-) –  NSGod Apr 25 '11 at 3:15

2 Answers 2

You are not using UIColor as a pointer.

Try using UIColor * instead of just UIColor and the compiler will stop complaining

share|improve this answer
    
I can try that, but remember that most of the code ontop is pseudo (not tested :) ). The main problem is that self.appDelegate.car tells me that car is not a member of appDelegate. Ill read through my code and make sure im using pointers properly, just in case. –  Rudy Cortes Apr 25 '11 at 3:03
2  
Pseudocode doesn't mean "I just typed this in and I'm not certain it will compile," it means "simple notation that describes exactly what I want the program to do, but which isn't written in any formal computer language and is meant only to be read and not compiled." If you're going to ask us why your code doesn't work, the least you could do is to post real code and make sure that it does, in fact, compile. –  William Shakespeare Apr 25 '11 at 3:16
    
Thanks for the enlightening education on the meaning of pseudocode. All these years i have been thinking it meant "I just typed this in and I'm not certain it will compile,". Besides, how can i paste something that "does,in fact, compile", when it does not and thats why im asking help?? I was trying to illustrate a concept. Why cant i access a property of an instance from a reference to that instance. –  Rudy Cortes Apr 25 '11 at 3:26
    
such as self.car.setColor() it works (in the delegate) but self.delegate.car.serColor() (in the viewController) does not work, even though self.delegate is properly initialized. –  Rudy Cortes Apr 25 '11 at 3:29
    
@Rudy: if you tell us "This code doesn't compile" and then someone says "Well, you have a syntax error here" and then you say "Oh, but it's pseudocode, so syntax errors don't count", what exactly do you expect anyone to be able to help you with? –  Josh Caswell Apr 25 '11 at 8:09

First of all, the Car class has problems. The color property should be defined as retain, not assign. assign is generally for non-object type properties, such as an NSInteger, BOOL, int, etc., and for a special case of objects that shouldn’t be retained because they’d create retain cycles. Also, - (void)setColor(UIColor col); is not a valid method name, as it is written as if it were a function. In Objective-C, each parameter is preceded by a colon :.

For example, take the following method:

 - (void)setBodyColor:bodyColor lowerColor:lowerColor upperColor:upperColor;

While that is technically a valid method signature, it is generally written differently to make its usage more clear. As it’s defined above, each parameter is of type id, which is a generic object type. To make things clearer, you cast each argument to the type of objects they represent:

 - (void)setBodyColor:(UIColor *)bodyColor
           lowerColor:(UIColor *)lowerColor
           upperColor:(UIColor *)upperColor;

In addition to being defined incorrectly, it’s also superfluous since defining a read-write property named color implies that a -setColor: method will be defined. The code would look like this:

@interface Car: NSObject {
    UIColor *color;
}
@property (retain) UIColor *color;
@end


@implementation Car

@synthetize color;

- (void)dealloc {
   [color release];
   [super dealloc];
}
// If you need to override a method, that’s fine
- (void) setColor:(UIColor *)aColor
{
    [aColor retain];
    [color release];
    color = aColor;
    // do more stuff
}
@end

On to your delegate, it also has problems. First, myDelegate is defined as a subclass of UIApplicationDelegate, which is not even a class: it’s a protocol (or interface) that other objects can conform to. The car property should also be defined as retain, since it’s an object that your app delegate owns. Here, theView (which should likely be renamed to something like theViewController) should be typed as MyViewController to make it more clear.

@interface MyDelegate : NSObject <UIApplicationDelegate> {
    Car *car;
    MyViewController *theView;
}
@property (retain) Car *car;
@end


@implementation MyDelegate

@synthesize car;

- (void)dealloc {
   [car release];
   [theView release];
   [super dealloc];
}

- (BOOL)application:(UIApplication *)application
    didFinishLaunchingWithOptions:(NSDictionary *)launchOptions 
{    
    theView = [[MyViewController alloc] init];   

    return YES;
}

@end

The MyViewController class has problems in that the appDelegate is defined as retain when it should likely be assign. The app delegate itself is creating the view controller using alloc/init, meaning the app delegate “owns” the view controller. The view controller shouldn’t retain the app delegate because that would create a retain cycle (see Retain Cycles).

MyViewController.h

// forward declaration
@class MyDelegate;

@interface MyViewController: UIViewController {
    MyDelegate *appDelegate;  // non-retained
}
@property (assign) MyDelegate *appDelegate;
@end

MyViewController.m

#import "MyViewController.h"
#import "MyDelegate.h"

@implementation MyViewController

@synthesize appDelegate;

- (void)viewDidLoad {
    self.appDelegate = (MyDelegate*)[[UIApplication sharedApplication] delegate];
    [self.appDelegate.car setColor:[UIColor clearColor]];
    /// THIS IS MY ISSUSE!
    // [self.appDelegate.car setColor(UIColor);
}
@end
share|improve this answer
    
Thank NSGod. Good explanation. Ill give this a try. Cheers!! –  Rudy Cortes Apr 25 '11 at 3:33

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