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This is what I have so far. Isn't this all that you need? I keep getting the error "Error: Unbound module Std"

let r file =
    let chan = open_in file in
    Std.input_list (chan)
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5 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

If you don't have Extlib installed (and apparently you don't based on the error message above), then generally it's done something like this:

let read_file filename = 
let lines = ref [] in
let chan = open_in filename in
try
  while true; do
    lines := input_line chan :: !lines
  done; []
with End_of_file ->
  close_in chan;
  List.rev !lines ;;

If you do have Extlib:

let read_file filename =
  let chan = open_in filename in
  Std.input_list chan

...which is pretty much what you have.

If you have the Batteries-included library you could read a file into an Enum.t and iterate over it as follows:

let filelines = File.lines_of filename in
Enum.iter ( fun line -> (*Do something with line here*) ) filelines
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Thank you very much! –  Travis Apr 25 '11 at 20:12
    
fd leak detected in the extlib variant : input channel is not closed –  ygrek Nov 21 '12 at 16:08
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If you have OCaml Core library installed, then it can be made as simple as:

open Core.Std
let r file = In_channel.read_lines file

If you have corebuild installed, then you can just compile your code with it:

corebuild filename.byte

if your code resides in a file named filename.ml.

If you haven't OCaml Core installed, or do not want to mess with it, or some other "standard" library implementation, then you can implement it using a vanilla OCaml's standard library. There is a function input_line, defined in module Pervasives, that is automatically opened in all OCaml programs (i.e. all its definitions are accessible without further clarification with a module name). This function accepts a value of type in_channel and returns a line, read from this channel. Using this function you can easily implement a required function:

let read_lines name : string list =
  let ic = open_in name in
  let try_read () =
    try Some (input_line ic) with End_of_file -> None in
  let rec loop acc = match try_read () with
    | Some s -> loop (s :: acc)
    | None -> close_in ic; List.rev acc in
  loop []

This implementation uses recursion, that is much more natural to OCaml programming.

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Std.input_list apparently requires Extlib, which you should install on your system (libextlib-ocaml and libextlib-ocaml-dev on Debian systems).

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Here's a recursive solution using Scanf:

let read_all_lines file_name =
  let in_channel = open_in file_name in
  let rec read_recursive lines =
    try
      Scanf.fscanf in_channel "%[^\r\n]\n" (fun x -> read_recursive (x :: lines))
    with
      End_of_file ->
        lines in
  let lines = read_recursive [] in
  let _ = close_in_noerr in_channel in
  List.rev (lines);;

Usage:

let all_lines = read_all_lines "input.txt";;

However, I'd prefer to stream line-by-line:

let make_reader file_name =
  let in_channel = open_in file_name in
  let closed = ref false in
  let read_next_line = fun () ->
    if !closed then
      None
    else
      try
        Some (Scanf.fscanf in_channel "%[^\r\n]\n" (fun x -> x))
      with
        End_of_file ->
          let _ = close_in_noerr in_channel in
          let _ = closed := true in
          None in
  read_next_line;;

Usage:

let read_next = make_reader "input.txt";;
let next_line = read_next ();;

And may be a bit of icing:

type reader = {read_next : unit -> string option};;

let make_reader file_name =
  let in_channel = open_in file_name in
  let closed = ref false in
  let read_next_line = fun () ->
    if !closed then
      None
    else
      try
        Some (Scanf.fscanf in_channel "%[^\r\n]\n" (fun x -> x))
      with
        End_of_file ->
          let _ = close_in_noerr in_channel in
          let _ = closed := true in
          None in
  {read_next = read_next_line};;

Usage:

let r = make_reader "input.txt";;
let next_line = r.read_next ();;

Hope this helps!

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http://caml.inria.fr/pub/docs/manual-ocaml/libref/Scanf.html#space **...Similarly, a line feed character in the format string matches either a single line feed or a carriage return followed by a line feed** So, this solution "should" work for both "\r\n" and "\n" style line endings (only tested on a Linux system). –  Asiri Rathnayake Nov 10 '12 at 14:22
    
all code snippets do not close input channels, hence leak file descriptors –  ygrek Nov 21 '12 at 16:09
    
@ygrek: Thanks! Fixed. May be it's better to let the calling party do the opening / closing business and have these functions take input channels instead. –  Asiri Rathnayake Nov 21 '12 at 16:47
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Another style to read lines from a file using Scanf "string indiciation" and zero-width character. It is like traditional imperative style.

open Scanf 
open Printf

(* little helper functions *)
let id x = x 
let const x = fun _ -> x
let read_line file = fscanf file "%s@\n" id 
let is_eof file = try fscanf file "%0c" (const false) with End_of_file -> true

let _ = 
  let file = open_in "/path/to/file" in 

  while not (is_eof file) do 
    let s = read_line file in
    (* do something with s *) 
    printf "%s\n" s 
  done;

  close_in file

NOTE:

  1. read_line ignore one trailing \n, so if the last character of your file is \n, it may seems like you have missed the last empty line.
  2. when using of Scanf, due to bufferization, do not mix other low level reading on the same channel, otherwise it will result in strange behaviour.
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