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I've got a timestamp in the following format (Which can easily be changed thanks to the beauties of PHP!).

2011-02-12 14:44:00

What is the quickest/simplest way to check if this timestamp was taken today?

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1  
do you mean "on this day" or within the last 24 hours? – Mark Elliot Apr 25 '11 at 4:11
2  
@Mark This might help en.wiktionary.org/wiki/today ;) – Rudie Apr 25 '11 at 4:28
5  
definition of today: "this day" – Web_Designer Apr 25 '11 at 4:53
up vote 57 down vote accepted

I think:

date('Ymd') == date('Ymd', strtotime($timestamp))
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i think check equal between 2 integer is better than 2 string – D.A.V.O.O.D Apr 25 '11 at 4:15
    
@Davood I'd be curious to know why. – deceze Apr 25 '11 at 4:18
    
1. if case sensitive of 2 string be diffrent, return false, 2. for php optimization check equal between 2 integer is more optimal between 2 string . this is my idea . – D.A.V.O.O.D Apr 25 '11 at 4:23
4  
Technically, they're both strings. They will be evaluated as two integers though (PHP is crazy). In thise case that doesn't matter, because both sides are 8 characters (digits) long and none start with 0. If either were false, you'd have to use ===. – Rudie Apr 25 '11 at 4:26
1  
@Davood You're explicitly creating two strings of the format Y-m-d there, no case sensitivity problems possible. Maybe two integers are faster to compare, but you'll have to convert both into an integer before you can compare them, which is more overhead than comparing two strings directly. – deceze Apr 25 '11 at 4:30
if (date('Y-m-d') == date('Y-m-d', strtotime('2011-02-12 14:44:00'))) {
    // is today
}
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$offset = date('Z'); //timezone offset in seconds

if (floor(($UNIX_TIMESTAMP + $offset) / 86400) == floor((mktime(0,0,0) + $offset) / 86400)){
    echo "today";
}
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I prefer to compare timestamps (rather then date strings), so I use this to check today.

$dayString = "2011-02-12 14:44:00";
$dayStringSub = substr($dayString, 0, 10);

$isToday = ( strtotime('now') >= strtotime($dayStringSub . " 00:00") 
          && strtotime('now') <  strtotime($dayStringSub . " 23:59") );

Fiddle: http://ideone.com/55JBku

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Some explanation about your answer would be helpful – Machavity Aug 17 '14 at 21:04

are you mean this ?

if( strtotime( date( 'Y-m-d' , strtotime( '2011-02-12 14:44:00' ) ) ) == strtotime( date( 'Y-m-d' ) ) )
{
//IS TODAY;
}
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5  
That's just a waste of date calculations... – Rudie Apr 25 '11 at 4:25
    
why ? i think it's more better ! – D.A.V.O.O.D Apr 25 '11 at 4:26
    
It's more better..? Sure... but it's still a waste of date calculations. Without the 2 strtotime's, you know enough to make the evaluation. – Rudie Apr 25 '11 at 4:30
1  
Furthermore, this may result in incorrect values. UNIX timestamps are seconds and strtotime fills in any information that's not in the given date string from the current time. I.e. the hours, minutes and seconds part of strtotime('2011-02-12') will be taken from the current time. In the rare circumstance that the time advances by one second between the first call to strtotime and the second, you may get two different timestamps for the same day. – deceze Apr 25 '11 at 4:36

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