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I'd like to know whether my app is being run on device or simulator at run time. Is there a way to detect this?

Reason being to test bluetooth api with simulator: http://volcore.limbicsoft.com/2009/09/iphone-os-31-gamekit-pt-1-woooohooo.html

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No need for checking for that at runtime, just use the TARGET_IPHONE_SIMULATOR definition to distinguish that case from the running on device case. –  Till Apr 25 '11 at 5:24
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5 Answers

up vote 51 down vote accepted
#if TARGET_IPHONE_SIMULATOR

//Simulator

#else

// Device

#endif

Pls refer this previous SO question also What #defines are set up by Xcode when compiling for iPhone

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4  
Note that these are compile time macros and not available at runtime. –  Eric Aug 1 '12 at 23:47
1  
#include "TargetConditionals.h" // if your source is in c –  Scott Stensland Nov 17 '12 at 14:57
    
Braces are unnecessary. –  adnako Dec 12 '12 at 7:39
1  
Does the StackOverflow crowd have a reading comprehension problem? The question was to ask about distinguishing at runtime not at compile time! The right answer is the SIM macro by Fernando Cervantes, and not this one. Yet as of this comment writing, this wrong answer has 32 points and the right one has but 3. –  StCredZero Oct 29 '13 at 18:52
1  
@StCredZero Perhaps that is because code compiled to run on the simulator can't run on a device and vice versa, so in the end it doesn't matter wether you do the check at compile time or at run time. –  Johan Kool Mar 17 at 4:14
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I created a macro in which you can specify which actions you want to perform inside parentheses and these actions will only be performed if the device is being simulated.

#define SIM(x) if ([[[UIDevice currentDevice].model lowercaseString] rangeOfString:@"simulator"].location != NSNotFound){x;}

This is used like this:

SIM(NSLog(@"This will only be logged if the device is simulated"));
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You can use the TARGET_IPHONE_SIMULATOR preprocessor macro to distinguish between device and simulator targets.

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TARGET_IPHONE_SIMULATOR is defined on the device (but defined to false). and defined as below

#if TARGET_IPHONE_SIMULATOR
NSString * const DeviceMode = @"Simulator";
#else
NSString * const DeviceMode = @"Device";
#endif

Just use DeviceMode to know between device and simulator

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That didn't work, my code still gets called I've added a better query to the device at runtime

#ifdef TARGET_IPHONE_SIMULATOR // does not work
    NSRange range =[[[UIDevice currentDevice] model] rangeOfString:@"Simulator"];
    if (range.location != NSNotFound) { // works
       ...
    }
#endif
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#ifdef doesn't work, no. You have to use #if. TARGET_IPHONE_SIMULATOR is always defined; defined as 0 or 1. So #ifdef results in always true. –  Graham Perks May 27 at 20:55
    
Also, you may have to (e.g. if using .cpp files), #import <TargetConditionals.h> to get this symbol defined. The simulator SDK defines it as 1; the iOS device SDK defines it to 0. –  Graham Perks May 27 at 21:18
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