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I want to round the number 1732 to the nearest ten, hundred and thousand. I tried with Math round functions, but it was written only for float and double. How to do this for Integer? Is there any function in java?

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Your chosen answer is edited. –  lschin Apr 26 '11 at 3:27
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9 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Use Precision (Apache Commons Math 3.1.1)

Precision.round(double, scale); // return double
Precision.round(float, scale); // return float

Use MathUtils (Apache Commons Math) - Older versions

MathUtils.round(double, scale); // return double
MathUtils.round(float, scale); // return float

scale - The number of digits to the right of the decimal point. (+/-)


Discarded because method round(float, scale) be used.

Math.round(MathUtils.round(1732, -1)); // nearest ten, 1730
Math.round(MathUtils.round(1732, -2)); // nearest hundred, 1700
Math.round(MathUtils.round(1732, -3)); // nearest thousand, 2000


Better solution

int i = 1732;
MathUtils.round((double) i, -1); // nearest ten, 1730.0
MathUtils.round((double) i, -2); // nearest hundred, 1700.0
MathUtils.round((double) i, -3); // nearest thousand, 2000.0
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What rounding mechanism do you want to use? Here's a primitive approach, for positive numbers:

int roundedNumber = (number + 500) / 1000 * 1000;

This will bring something like 1499 to 1000 and 1500 to 2000.

If you could have negative numbers:

int offset = (number >= 0) ? 500 : -500;
int roundedNumber = (number + offset) / 1000 * 1000;
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Anonymous downvoter, thanks. Any reason? –  EboMike Apr 25 '11 at 7:21
    
this here is the right approach: int r = ((int)((n + 500) / 1000)) * 1000 since only the casting to int cuts off the digits –  nils petersohn Jul 11 '12 at 9:24
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@nils: That doesn't make ANY sense. The numbers are already ints (as per OP), so casting an int to int does nothing. –  EboMike Jul 11 '12 at 16:21
    
there is not type defined in your approach for "number"! so it makes ALL sense my friend. –  nils petersohn Aug 12 '12 at 12:51
    
"number" is an integer. Read the original question again. –  EboMike Aug 13 '12 at 6:16
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(int)(Math.round( 1732 / 10.0) * 10)
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I think 10D is what you mean instead of 10L. Isn't it? +1 –  Adeel Ansari Apr 25 '11 at 6:43
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You could try:

int y = 1732;
int x = y - y % 10;

The result will be 1730.

Edit: This doesn't answer the question. It simply removes part of the number but doesn't "round to the nearest".

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1736 would also go to 1730, which wouldn't be the nearest ten. –  EboMike Apr 25 '11 at 6:35
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...and the result for 1739 will also be 1730. Not most people's expectation for rounding. –  rlibby Apr 25 '11 at 6:36
    
@EboMike: you are 100% right. –  cherouvim Apr 25 '11 at 6:36
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Add 5 to y before applying your snippet and you have the nearest in the common sense. Example 1736 -> 1741 -> 1740. –  Pascal Cuoq Apr 25 '11 at 6:40
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@Pascal: That will only work for positive numbers though. –  EboMike Apr 25 '11 at 6:42
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At nearest ten:

int i = 1986;
int result;

result = i%10 > 5 ? ((i/10)*10)+10 : (i/10)*10;

(Add zero's at will for hundred and thousand).

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why not just check the unit digit... 1. if it is less than or equal to 5, add 0 at the unit position and leave the number as it is. 2. if it is more than 5, increment the tens digit, add 0 at the unit position.

ex: 1736 (since 6 >=5) the rounded number will be 1740. now for 1432 (since 2 <5 ) the rounded number will be 1430....

I hope this will work... if not than let me know about those cases...

Happy Programming,

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very simple. try this

int y = 173256457;int x = (y/10)*10; 

Now in this you can replace 10 by 100,1000 and so on....

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As mentioned in other answers, this would bring 1739 to 1730 instead of 1740. –  EboMike Apr 25 '11 at 7:21
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Its very easy..

int x = 1234; int y = x - x % 10; //It will give 1230

int y = x - x % 100; //It will give 1200

int y = x - x % 1000; //It will give 1000

The above logic will just convert the last digits to 0. If you want actual round of// For eg. 1278 this should round off to 1280 because last digit 8 > 5 for this i wrote a function check it out.

 private double returnAfterRoundDigitNum(double paramNumber, int noOfDigit)  
    {  
     double tempSubtractNum = paramNumber%(10*noOfDigit);  
     double tempResultNum = (paramNumber - tempSubtractNum);  
     if(tempSubtractNum >= (5*noOfDigit))  
      {  
          tempResultNum = tempResultNum + (10*noOfDigit);  
      }  
      return tempResultNum;  
   }  

Here pass 2 parameters one is the number and the other is position till which you have to round off.

Regards, Abhinav

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Have you looked at the implementation of Mathutils.round() ? It's all based on BigDecimal and string conversions. Hard to imagine many approaches that are less efficient.

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