Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In JavaDoc of Session class the description of delete method is:

Remove a persistent instance from the datastore. The argument may be an instance associated with the receiving Session or a transient instance with an identifier associated with existing persistent state.

My questions are:

  1. I want to delete a detach object, can I use this method, AFAIK session first makes an object persistent from detach and then perform its operation. Am I right?
  2. If I am not sure about the existence of the object in database, should I use Session.get() to check the whether or not it is null and then perform delete operation or I can use directly delete operation?

Here is a code snippet:

public void removeUnallocatedUserIfExits(final long itemId) {
    getHibernateTemplate().execute(new HibernateCallback() {

        public Object doInHibernate(Session session) throws HibernateException, SQLException {
            session.flush();
            session.setCacheMode(CacheMode.IGNORE);
            UnallocatedUser unallocatedUser;
            if ((unallocatedUser = (UnallocatedUser) session.get(UnallocatedUser.class, itemId)) != null) {
                session.delete(unallocatedUser);
            }
            session.flush();
            return null;
        }
    });
}

Is the okay? Thank you.

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted

or a transient instance with an identifier associated with existing persistent state

This means you can directly pass your entity to session.delete(), in order to delete that object. Further, you need not check whether the entity exist or not. There should be an exception if no record found in the database. In fact, we usually don't really get this case. We always delete an existing entity, I mean usual logic is like that. So, no need to do this,

SomeEntity ent = session.get(SomeEntity.class, '1234');
session.delete(ent);

You can do this instead,

SomeEntity ent = new SomeEntity('1234'); // used constructor for brevity
session.delete(ent);

BTW, you can also use this version session.delete(String query),

sess.delete("from Employee e where e.id = '1234'"); // Just found it is deprecated
share|improve this answer

Try this...

public <T> T delete(T t) throws Exception {
    try {
        t = load(t);
        session.delete(t);
        session.flush();
    } catch (Exception e) {
        throw e;
    } finally {
        session.clear();
    }

    return t;
}

public <T> T load(T t) {
    session.buildLockRequest(LockOptions.NONE).lock(t);
    return t;
}
share|improve this answer

I want to delete a detach object, can I use this method, AFAIK session first makes an object persistent from detach and then perform its operation. Am I right?

If you know the identifier of the object you want to delete, then you can create an instance with its identifier set and pass it to session delete method. This instance would be considered to be in detached state ( since there is an identifier associated), however it will be internally reattached to session by Hibernate and then deleted.

If I am not sure about the existence of the object in database, should I use Session.get() to check the whether or not it is null and then perform delete operation or I can use directly delete operation?

The delete method will throw StaleObjectException if it cannot find the object to be deleted. So you can use exception handling to decide what to do in that case.

share|improve this answer

Just found one better solution:

Query q = session.createQuery("delete Entity where id = X");
q.executeUpdate();

Hibernate Delete query

share|improve this answer

You can easily achieve by following simple hibernate as follows,

Session session=getSession();  
String hql = "delete from Student where classId= :id"; 
session.createQuery(hql).setString("id", new Integer(id)).executeUpdate();
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.