Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

I like to implement linked list in c++ ,while adding new node I dynamically allocate it, if some allocation fails I would like my program to stop the execution.

After the "new Node" fails the exception is thrown so do I have to call the destructor explicitly in the exception handler. how can I deal with this situation in order to prevent memory leak? Here is my code that I have written

LinkedList.h

#pragma once
#include <iostream>
#include <string.h>
using namespace std;

class LinkedList
{
public:
    class Iterator; 
private:
    class Node
    {
        friend class Iterator;
        friend class LinkedList;
        char* m_word;
        Node *m_next;
        Node(const char* word,Node* next = NULL,Node* prev = NULL);
        ~Node();
    };
    Node *m_head,*m_tail;
    size_t m_num;
public:
    LinkedList():m_head(NULL),m_tail(NULL),m_num(0){};
    ~LinkedList();
    LinkedList& addFirst(const char* word);
    LinkedList& addLast(const char* word);
    Iterator erase(Iterator& it);
    Iterator begin();
    Iterator end();
    Iterator find(const char* word);
    size_t size()const{return m_num;};
    void print();

    friend class Iterator;
    class Iterator
    {
        LinkedList& m_list;
        Node *m_prev,*m_cur;
        friend class LinkedList;
        void next();
        void setLast(){m_cur = NULL,m_prev = m_list.m_tail;}
    public:
        Iterator(LinkedList& linkedList):m_list(linkedList),m_prev(NULL),m_cur(linkedList.m_head){}
        Iterator& operator++();
        char* operator*();
        bool operator != (Iterator& it){return (m_cur != it.m_cur || m_prev != it.m_prev);}
    };
};

LinkedList.cpp

#include "LinkedList.h"


LinkedList::Node::Node(const char* word,LinkedList::Node* prev,LinkedList::Node *next)
{
    char* tmpWord = new char[strlen(word)+1];
    strcpy(tmpWord,word);
    m_word = tmpWord;
    m_next = next;
    if(prev != NULL)
        prev->m_next = this;
}
LinkedList::Node::~Node()
{
    delete[] m_word;
}

LinkedList::~LinkedList(void)
{
    for(Iterator it = begin();it != end();)
        erase(it);
}
LinkedList& LinkedList::addFirst(const char* word)
{
    Node* node = new Node(word,NULL,m_head);
    m_head = node;
    if(m_tail == NULL)
        m_tail = m_head;
    ++m_num;
    return *this;
}
LinkedList& LinkedList::addLast(const char*word)
{
    if(m_head == NULL)
        addFirst(word);
    else
    {
        Node* node = new Node(word,m_tail,NULL);
        m_tail = node;
    }
    ++m_num;
    return *this;
}
LinkedList::Iterator LinkedList::begin()
{
    Iterator it(*this);
    return it;
}
LinkedList::Iterator LinkedList::end()
{
    Iterator it(*this);
    it.setLast();
    return it;
}
LinkedList::Iterator LinkedList::erase(LinkedList::Iterator& it)
{
    if(it.m_cur != NULL)
    {
        Node* tmp = it.m_cur;
        if(it.m_prev != NULL)
            it.m_cur = it.m_prev->m_next = tmp->m_next;
        else
            it.m_cur = it.m_list.m_head = tmp->m_next;
        if(tmp == it.m_list.m_tail)
            it.m_list.m_tail = NULL;
        delete tmp;
        --m_num;
    }
    return it;
}
LinkedList::Iterator LinkedList::find(const char* word)
{
    Iterator it = begin();
    for(;it != end();++it)
    {
        if(!strcmp(it.m_cur->m_word,word))
            break;
    }
    return it;
}

void LinkedList::Iterator::next()
{
    if(m_cur != NULL)
    {
        m_prev = m_cur;
        m_cur = m_cur->m_next;
    }
    else
        m_prev = NULL;
    return;
}
void LinkedList::print()
{
    for(Iterator it = begin();it !=end();++it)
        cout << it.m_cur->m_word;
}
LinkedList::Iterator& LinkedList::Iterator::operator ++()
{
    next();
    return *this;
}
char* LinkedList::Iterator::operator *()
{
    return m_cur->m_word;
}

//int main()
//{
//  LinkedList ll;
//  ll.addFirst("1");
//  ll.addFirst("2");
//  ll.addLast("3");
//  ll.addLast("4");
//  LinkedList::Iterator it = ll.find("5");
//  return 0;
//}
share|improve this question
    
You have posted your question again ? I thought why my answer is not appearing ! :) – iammilind Apr 25 '11 at 7:36
    
Please don't ask the same question twice - it distracts people who would otherwise be thinking of answers. – sharptooth Apr 25 '11 at 7:38
1  
If you want to store a string, why not use std::string? – Bo Persson Apr 25 '11 at 7:49
up vote 2 down vote accepted

After the "new Node" fails the exception is thrown.

so do I have to call the destructor explicitly in the exception handler.

No. If the constructor did not finish then you can not call the destructor (the object was never created).

how can I deal with this situation in order to prevent memory leak?

If the exception is thrown in new (std::bad_alloc) then there is nothing you need to do.

If the exception is thrown from the constructor. Then every fully constructed member will have its destructor called automatically. So you don't need to worry about normal members. If any of your members are pointers (that have been initialized in the constructor) then you need to make sure that these get deleted (which is why you don't want RAW pointers in your object (you want smart pointers)).

Saying that. You do not use smart pointers but I can't see any obvious leaks.

But you have a RAW pointer in your class that is owned. You have not read about the rule of 3 (look it up). Currently because you do not obey the rule of 3 the follwoing code will crash.

void myCode()
{
    LinkedList    list1;
    list1.addFirst("Martin");

    LinkedList    list2(list1);
}
share|improve this answer

If new is failing then you don't have to worry about memory leak, because you haven't allocated anything yet. You can just log that error message if needed and get ahead with the existing linked list.

share|improve this answer

I don't see any exception handler there. iammilind's answer is fair, but even if you don't want to log the failure, you must write an exception handler, because if you are not, the exception goes up to higher context, it can stop your program with a well known message that you can see in debuggers: UNHANDLED EXTEPTION at .... I suspect you tought that under the term memory-leak.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.