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I am looking for an elegant way to get the OS version like: "Windows XP Professional Service Pack 1" or "Windows Server 2008 Standard Edition" etc. Is there an elegant way of doing that? I am also interested in the processor architecture (like x86 or x64).

cheers

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2  
Be careful, I've seen lots of code samples for this that breaks when the user is not an admin... and of course lots of code samples that works for a non-admin user as well. Just be wary ^^ –  Oskar Duveborn Feb 23 '09 at 14:08

8 Answers 8

up vote 26 down vote accepted

You can use WMI to get the product name ("Microsoft® Windows Server® 2008 Enterprise "):

using System.Management;
var name = (from x in new ManagementObjectSearcher("SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem").Get().OfType<ManagementObject>()
                      select x.GetPropertyValue("Caption")).FirstOrDefault();
return name != null ? name.ToString() : "Unknown";
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2  
Use FirstOrDefault instead of First method or this line will fail with exception due to invocation of First of empty collection. –  franza Nov 13 '12 at 16:54
    
Using Cast<T> instead of OfType<T> also yields slightly better performance. –  Derek W Mar 18 at 14:00

Why not use Environment.OSVersion? It will also tell you what operating this is - Windows, Mac OS X, Unix, etc. To find out if you are running in 64bit or 32bit, use IntPtr.Size - this will return 4 bytes for 32bit and 8 bytes for 64bit.

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Environment.OSVersion does give you the human version of hte OS name. For example, where WMI will give you Microsoft Windows 8.1 Pro, Environment.OSVersion gives Microsoft Windows NT 6.2.9200.0. –  Sean Kearon Mar 20 at 7:19

One thing to be careful of is this information is usually localized and will report differently depending on the language of the OS.

You can get a lot of info from WMI look for the Win32_OperatingSystem class

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WMI seems to be future proof as it returns the friendly name out of the box without any conversion... Will take a closer look. Thanks... –  Stefan Koell Feb 23 '09 at 14:06

Sample output:

Name = Windows Vista
Edition = Home Premium
Service Pack = Service Pack 1
Version = 6.0.6001.65536
Bits = 64

Sample class:

class Program
{
    static void Main( string[] args )
    {
        Console.WriteLine( "Operation System Information" );
        Console.WriteLine( "----------------------------" );
        Console.WriteLine( "Name = {0}", OSInfo.Name );
        Console.WriteLine( "Edition = {0}", OSInfo.Edition );
        Console.WriteLine( "Service Pack = {0}", OSInfo.ServicePack );
        Console.WriteLine( "Version = {0}", OSInfo.VersionString );
        Console.WriteLine( "Bits = {0}", OSInfo.Bits );
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

Source code for OSInfo class: http://www.csharp411.com/determine-windows-version-and-edition-with-c/ However there is an error in the code, you will need to replace the "case 6" statement (it's just before #endregion NAME) with this:

case 6:
    switch (minorVersion)
    {
        case 0:

            switch (productType)
            {
                case 1:
                    name = "Windows Vista";
                    break;
                case 3:
                    name = "Windows Server 2008";
                    break;
            }
            break;
        case 1:
            switch (productType)
            {
                case 1:
                    name = "Windows 7";
                    break;
                case 3:
                    name = "Windows Server 2008 R2";
                    break;
            }
            break;
    }
    break;

And if you want to go a step further and see if your program is running in 64 or 32 bit:

public static class Wow
{
    public static bool Is64BitProcess
    {
        get { return IntPtr.Size == 8; }
    }

    public static bool Is64BitOperatingSystem
    {
        get
        {
            // Clearly if this is a 64-bit process we must be on a 64-bit OS.
            if (Is64BitProcess)
                return true;
            // Ok, so we are a 32-bit process, but is the OS 64-bit?
            // If we are running under Wow64 than the OS is 64-bit.
            bool isWow64;
            return ModuleContainsFunction("kernel32.dll", "IsWow64Process") && IsWow64Process(GetCurrentProcess(), out isWow64) && isWow64;
        }
    }

    static bool ModuleContainsFunction(string moduleName, string methodName)
    {
        IntPtr hModule = GetModuleHandle(moduleName);
        if (hModule != IntPtr.Zero)
            return GetProcAddress(hModule, methodName) != IntPtr.Zero;
        return false;
    }

    [DllImport("kernel32.dll", SetLastError = true)]
    [return: MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.Bool)]
    extern static bool IsWow64Process(IntPtr hProcess, [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.Bool)] out bool isWow64);
    [DllImport("kernel32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Auto, SetLastError = true)]
    extern static IntPtr GetCurrentProcess();
    [DllImport("kernel32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Auto)]
    extern static IntPtr GetModuleHandle(string moduleName);
    [DllImport("kernel32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Ansi, SetLastError = true)]
    extern static IntPtr GetProcAddress(IntPtr hModule, string methodName);
}
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I have Windows 8.1, but it says Windows Vista... Looking through the source code there isn't even a case statement for Windows 7 or 8... –  The Muffin Man Jun 10 at 17:56
    
@TheMuffinMan - Maybe because that was written 2.5 years ago? You will have to update it as new versions of windows come out. –  Orwellophile Jun 24 at 14:26

For example like that:

EDIT: Yes, unfortunately it seems that with each new version of Windows we get a different mechanism ;)

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first link looks good. however, I really wish there's a better - future proof way. You always need to maintain the OS versions in the code... thanks again –  Stefan Koell Feb 23 '09 at 13:41

Note that the processor architecture question is complex:

do you mean (higher numers require lower numbers to be true):

  1. The CPU is capable for handling 64bit (in the sense that it supports AMD/intel x64 or Itanium)
  2. The Operating system is 64bit
    • GPR and pointers are 64bits, i.e. XP 64, Vista 64, a 64 bit server release or a 64bit OS for mono
  3. The currently executing process is a 64 bit process (not executing under Wow64 for example)

if you are happy that all 3 must be true then

IntPtr.Size == 8

Indicates that all three are true

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Isn't this the same as IntPtr.Size == 8? –  Hosam Aly Feb 23 '09 at 13:51
    
I understand that this question is complex - as you said. But I am just interested which Framework Version is handling my executable. So I thing the IntPtr method will suffice. –  Stefan Koell Feb 23 '09 at 13:54
    
@Hosam: Not exactly. IntPtr.Size is the right thing to do though. –  configurator Feb 23 '09 at 14:39
    
@configurator: Could you kindly explain how they are different? –  Hosam Aly Feb 24 '09 at 11:19

You should really try to avoid WMI for local use. It is very convenient but you pay dearly for it in terms of performance. This is quick and simple:

    public string HKLM_GetString(string path, string key)
    {
        try
        {
            RegistryKey rk = Registry.LocalMachine.OpenSubKey(path);
            if (rk == null) return "";
            return (string)rk.GetValue(key);
        }
        catch { return ""; }
    }

    public string FriendlyName()
    {
        string ProductName = HKLM_GetString(@"SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion", "ProductName");
        string CSDVersion = HKLM_GetString(@"SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion", "CSDVersion");
        if (ProductName != "")
        {
            return (ProductName.StartsWith("Microsoft") ? "" : "Microsoft ") + ProductName +
                        (CSDVersion != "" ? " " + CSDVersion : "");
        }
        return "";
    }
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Check this: http://www.csharp411.com/determine-windows-version-and-edition-with-c/

Its a nice and comprehensive C# library that gets a good amount of OS info.

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Yeah it's true, you need to update the OS info base on Microsoft library, refer here : msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/… –  mutanic Sep 25 '13 at 4:14

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