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I am trying to capture the very first moment when a component is show on the screen - without using 'dirty' solutions as with use of a timer. Basically I want to know a moment when I can safely start using getLocationOnScreen() method on the component.

I thought that component listener could help but no luck here. I am stack for now and do not know which listener to use for this. Any suggestions?

Sample code, which shows that component listener fails, is below.

import java.awt.Color;
import java.awt.Dimension;
import java.awt.event.ComponentAdapter;
import java.awt.event.ComponentEvent;
import java.awt.event.ComponentListener;
import java.awt.event.MouseAdapter;
import java.awt.event.MouseEvent;
import java.awt.event.MouseListener;
import javax.swing.JComponent;
import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JPanel;

public class CompListenerTest
{
    static ComponentListener cL = new ComponentAdapter()
    {
        @Override
        public void componentShown(ComponentEvent e)
        {
            super.componentShown(e);
            System.out.println("componentShown");
        }
    };

    static MouseListener mL = new MouseAdapter() 
    {

        @Override
        public void mousePressed(MouseEvent e)
        {
            super.mousePressed(e);
            JComponent c = (JComponent) e.getSource();
            System.out.println("mousePressed c="+c.isShowing());
        }

    };

    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        JPanel p = new JPanel();
        p.setPreferredSize(new Dimension(300, 400));
        p.setBackground(Color.GREEN);
        p.addComponentListener(cL);
        p.addMouseListener(mL);

        System.out.println("initial test p="+p.isShowing());
        JPanel contentPane = new JPanel();
        contentPane.setBackground(Color.RED);
        contentPane.add(p);
        JFrame f = new JFrame();
        f.setContentPane(contentPane);
        f.setSize(800, 600);
        f.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        f.setVisible(true);
    }
}

Thanks in advance, Boro.

share|improve this question
    
Thanks to all for so many answers :) I am in the middle of checking which is the most appropriate/best for my particular case. Great stuff all. Apologies for so late response I have been on 3 lunches and it takes a while :) –  Boro Apr 25 '11 at 16:35

6 Answers 6

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The reason a ComponentListener doesn't work is that it reports changes to the visible property - and that is true by default, even without being part of the component hierarchy.

To be reliably notified, use a HierarchyListener


Edit (musings about my knowledge evolution in regard to this question/answers, not sure what the netiquette has to say about doing it ... simply guide me if that's the wrong way to go :-)

First: the question as asked in the subject is not necessarily related to the actual problem (as commented by Boro below - any way to link to a comment?): there's no need to keep some kind of local flag to decide whether or not it is safe to send a getLocationOnScreen to a component, simply ask the component itself. Learn-item 1 for myself :-)

Second: The question as asked is quite interesting. Five experts (including myself, self-proclaimed), five different answers. Which triggered a bit of digging on my part.

My hypothesis: ComponentEvents are not useful for notification of (first-)showing. I knew that componentShown is useless because it's a kind-of propertyChange notification of the visible property of a component (which rarely changes). Puzzled about the suggested usefulness of moved/resized, though.

Constructing a use-case: fully prepare the frame in the example and keep it ready for later showing, a typical approach to improve perceived performance. My prediction - based on my hypothesis: resized/moved fired at prepare-time, nothing at show-time (note: the isShowing is what we are after, that is the latter). A snippet to add in the OP's example:

    final JFrame f = new JFrame();
    f.setContentPane(contentPane);
    f.setSize(800, 600);
    //        f.pack(); 

    JFrame controller = new JFrame("opener");
    controller.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
    Action open = new AbstractAction("open/hide second") {

        @Override
        public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
            f.setVisible(!f.isVisible());
        }

    };
    controller.add(new JButton(open));
    controller.pack();
    controller.setVisible(true);

Disappointment: no notification at prepare-time, notification at show-time, just as needed, my hypothesis seemed wrong ;-) Last chance: swap the setSize for a pack ... and voila, notification at prepare-time, no notification at show-time, happy me again. Playing a bit more: looks like ComponentEvents are fired if the a component is displayable, which may or may not be useful in some contexts but not if showing is the state we are after. The

New imperial rules (draft):
Do not use ComponentListener for notification of "showing". That's left-over from AWT-age.
Do use AncestorListener. That seems to be the Swing replacement, slightly misnomed notification of "added" which actually means "showing"
Do use HierarchyListener only if really interested in fine-grained state changes

share|improve this answer
    
@Andrew haha .. no chance to get away with my active boycott of those distracting inline code formats ;-) –  kleopatra Apr 25 '11 at 11:50
    
There is no escape. ;) (Actually I just noticed a typo., when I went to change it, my itchy ` fingers got to work.) –  Andrew Thompson Apr 25 '11 at 12:02
    
Thank you @kleopatra for the explanation and the solution. After reading the Java doc for the HierarchyListener, I think I will go with your solution, since it seems to be the most appropriate one, especially for my case. +1 for all of the above. –  Boro Apr 25 '11 at 17:09
    
Just for the reference. If you want to be sure about the time you can call the getLocationOnScreen() method, you should use isShowing() method and only call it when it returns true. –  Boro Apr 25 '11 at 17:24
    
@kleopatra thank you for the long explanation. It is very useful in understanding the problem. Where it goes to your first edit, referring to the question title, I wanted the name of the listener and you all gave me some names. My comment was merely to fill the solution as HierarchyListener receives so many event, lots of them when the component is not showing, thus I was getting exceptions. I tried isDisplayable() it wasn't it. After checking the doc once more I got that isShowing() must return true before you can safely call getLocationOnScreen(). –  Boro Apr 26 '11 at 19:07

I"ve use an AncestorListener and handled the ancestorAdded event.

share|improve this answer
    
Good suggestion that works. Though I my particular case I need to use it for an object of the Container class, and it doesn't take AncestorListener's. –  Boro Apr 25 '11 at 17:03

Oddly, the ComponentListener works just fine when applied to the JFrame. Here is the altered source where I saw it work.

import java.awt.*;
import java.awt.event.*;
import javax.swing.*;

public class CompListenerTest
{
    static ComponentListener cL = new ComponentAdapter()
    {
        @Override
        public void componentShown(ComponentEvent e)
        {
            super.componentShown(e);
            System.out.println("componentShown");
        }
    };

    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        JPanel p = new JPanel();
        p.setPreferredSize(new Dimension(300, 400));
        p.setBackground(Color.GREEN);

        System.out.println("initial test p="+p.isShowing());
        JPanel contentPane = new JPanel();
        contentPane.setBackground(Color.RED);
        contentPane.add(p);
        JFrame f = new JFrame();
        f.addComponentListener(cL);
        f.setContentPane(contentPane);
        f.setSize(800, 600);
        f.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        f.setVisible(true);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
I think it is because you actively call setVisible (i.e. show()) in order to trigger the event COMPONENT_SHOWN. –  Howard Apr 25 '11 at 11:31
1  
no magical relation to static vs non-static involved: (as Howard already implied:) a top-level container's visible property is false by default, so there's an actual change –  kleopatra Apr 25 '11 at 11:47
    
@Howard, @kleopatra Edited my answer to remove that (inane) comment. :P –  Andrew Thompson Apr 25 '11 at 12:00
    
Yea. I have observed this myself. It is all fine with a JFrame. And it must be as you are saying guys, because of the call to the method of setVisible(). –  Boro Apr 25 '11 at 16:42
    
+1 for the interest and observation that is works for the JFrame. Though the fact it works with the frame doesn't help in my particular case at all. I need to know it, when the content of the frame is changed and in this case the frame is already visible. –  Boro Apr 25 '11 at 17:00

For most purposes you can go with the first call to ComponentListener.componentMoved (or if you are also interested in the size ComponentListener.componentResized). Those are called whenever the position/size of the component changes.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Thank you very much. This could be used as a solution. –  Boro Apr 25 '11 at 16:53
    
not reliable for notification of isShowing, please see the edit of my answer –  kleopatra Apr 26 '11 at 10:27
static ComponentListener cL = new ComponentAdapter() {
        @Override
        public void componentResized(ComponentEvent e) {
            super.componentResized(e);
            System.out.println("componentShown = "+e.getComponent().isDisplayable());
        }
    };
share|improve this answer
    
Good example for what @Howard says. +1 Thanks. –  Boro Apr 25 '11 at 16:53
    
not reliable for notification of isShowing, please see the edit of my answer –  kleopatra Apr 26 '11 at 10:28

Using AncestorListener and ancestorAdded worked for me. Here's sample code:

    addAncestorListener(new AncestorListener()
    {
        @Override
        public void ancestorRemoved(AncestorEvent event) {}

        @Override
        public void ancestorMoved(AncestorEvent event) {}

        @Override
        public void ancestorAdded(AncestorEvent event)
        {
            // component is shown here
        }
    });
share|improve this answer

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