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I have a class like that:

public class Zern extends Something{
 private int costA;
 private int costB;

 public int getcostA() {
     return costA;
 }

 public void setcostA(int costA) {
     this.costA = costA;
 }

 public int getcostB() {
     return costB;
 }

 public void setcostB(int costB) {
     this.costB = costB;
 }
}

I have a list that holds that kind of objects:

private List<Zern> zerns = new ArrayList<Zern>(MAX_ZERN_SIZE);

I will add new objects to my list however I always want to have a ordered list according to cost a and if there is an object at list which has the same cost with my object that I want to add I want to add that object according to their costB.

I mean:

Index of objects at list   0    1    2    3    4   5
CostA                     10   15   22   22   25  36
CostB                     26   12   17   19   23  44

If I want to add an object that has a costA 22 and costB 18, 
it will locate at index 3.

How can I do it effectively (because I will add an object to a sorted list so it means that I can use binary search - if it is possible I want to find a solution according to that) with Comparator or something like that?

share|improve this question
    
Exactly, you'll need to implement a custom Comparator. Here's an example. –  mre Apr 25 '11 at 12:48
    
You could also use a TreeSet with a custom comparator so that the collection remains sorted, and has 'binary search'-like lookup. –  MeBigFatGuy Apr 25 '11 at 13:13
    
For tree set it says: "This implementation provides guaranteed log(n) time cost for the basic operations (add, remove and contains)." also Comparator can be used for them. I see that it is so powerful but what is the good sides of array list over tree set otherwise tree set looks perfect? –  kamaci Apr 25 '11 at 13:17
    
You cannot access an item via its index as in a arraylist implementation. If you do not need it you should go with a sorted set. –  Howard Apr 25 '11 at 13:24
    
The zends list will not have any objects at first so I will add objects them from 0 to a limited number. Also I want to get the less cost object(according to costA, if equals with any other costB) at any time. These are my needs, I will not fill the list and after that sort it, it will be sorted every time cos I will add objects by order. So how can I find a solution?(maybe with TreeSet and comparator) –  kamaci Apr 25 '11 at 13:26
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2 Answers

Use Collections.sort with the following comparator:

Collections.sort(zerns, new Comparator<Zern>() {

    @Override
    public int compare(Zern z1, Zern z2) {
        if (z1.getcostA() == z2.getcostA()) {
            return z1.getcostB() == z2.getcostB() ? 0 : 
                z1.getcostB() < z2.getcostB() ? -1 : 1;
        } else {
            return z1.getcostA() < z2.getcostA() ? -1 : 1;
        }
    }
});

Update: If you do not need indexed access to your items you may want to use a sorted set implementation from the first place with a custom comparator:

TreeSet<Zern> zerns = new TreeSet<Zern>(new Comparator<Zern>() {

    @Override
    public int compare(Zern z1, Zern z2) {
        if (z1.getcostA() == z2.getcostA()) {
            return z1.getcostB() == z2.getcostB() ? 0 : 
                z1.getcostB() < z2.getcostB() ? -1 : 1;
        } else {
            return z1.getcostA() < z2.getcostA() ? -1 : 1;
        }
    }
});

Now objects can be added and your set will always remain sorted (note: I added a constructor and toString to your Zern class):

zerns.add(new Zern(10, 26));
System.out.println(zerns);     // => [(10,26)]
zerns.add(new Zern(22, 19));
System.out.println(zerns);     // => [(10,26), (22,19)]
zerns.add(new Zern(22, 17));
System.out.println(zerns);     // => [(10,26), (22,17), (22,19)]
zerns.add(new Zern(15, 12));
System.out.println(zerns);     // => [(10,26), (15,12), (22,17), (22,19)]

You can remove an item

zerns.remove(new Zern(22, 17));
System.out.println(zerns);     // => [(10,26), (15,12), (22,19)]

or remove the worst cost item

zerns.remove(zerns.last());
System.out.println(zerns);     // => [(10,26), (15,12)]

or get the best cost item via

System.out.println(zerns.first());    // => (10,26)
share|improve this answer
    
When I add elements to that list it means that the list will be sorted anytime. If I call Collections.sort(..... every time that I add an object to that list does it rearrange it? How I can use binary search with that comparator to get more efficiency? –  kamaci Apr 25 '11 at 13:06
    
If you want your collection to stay sorted after each add operation, use TreeSet with this custom comparator. –  Vladimir Ivanov Apr 25 '11 at 13:13
    
@kamaci Instead of an ArrayList you may use a TreeSet instead. –  Howard Apr 25 '11 at 13:14
    
@Howard I wrote a comment to my question. –  kamaci Apr 25 '11 at 13:27
    
Can you show an example how I will add, get and remove elements. For example I will loop this list until their best cost and I want to remove worst 5 cost objects at every loop so how can I implement it? –  kamaci Apr 25 '11 at 13:29
show 7 more comments

Just compare the first criteria. If they match, compare the second criteria:

public int compareTo(Zern other) {
   final int result;

    if (this.costA == other.costA) {
        if (this.costB > other.costB) {
            result = 1;
        } else if (this.costB < other.costB) {
            result = -1;
        } else {
            result = 0;
        }
    } else {
        if (this.costA > other.costA) {
            result = 1;
        } else if (this.costA < other.costA) {
            result = -1;
        } else {
            result = 0;
        }
    }

    return result;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Just as an additional note, it is a bad idea to just use subtraction to compare Integers. In the case of a=Integer.MIN_VALUE and b=10, for example, you will get a positive result, even though a is clearly much less than b. The correct way would be to check if a[<,=,>]b and return [-1,0,1] accordingly –  Java Drinker Apr 25 '11 at 13:43
    
@java drinker Fair enough. Updated. –  Isaac Truett Apr 25 '11 at 13:53
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