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Would like to create a shell script that will read the contents of a folder that contains many folders on a server- it should output a list of these folders with their size and date modified if possible.

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The size of a directory is often 4096. By "size", do you mean the number of entries in the directory? –  William Pursell Apr 25 '11 at 14:04

3 Answers 3

If you want to do it recursively (it's not clear to me from the question whether or not you do), you can do:

$ find /path/to/dir -type d -exec stat -c '%n: %s: %y' {} \;

(If you have a find which supports the feature, you can replace '\;' with '+')

Note that the %s gives the size of the directory, which is not the number of files in the directory, nor is it the disk usage of the files in the directory.

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with CGNU find, you dont need to call out to stat: find path -type d -printf "%f\t%s\t%TY-%Tm-%Td\n" –  glenn jackman Apr 25 '11 at 15:43
    
what does the %y stand for? –  James Apr 27 '11 at 18:48

ls -l /path/to/folder | grep ^d

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if i did this in vi, as a script- how would i put this output to a file, like a txt file. the full vi script would be helpful. –  James Apr 27 '11 at 18:49
    
Just wanted to say thanks a million for your help –  James May 19 '11 at 21:07

Try this find command to list sub-directories and their size (since stat command doesn't run same way on mac and Linux):

#!/bin/bash
find /your/base/dir -type d -exec du -k {} \; > sizes.txt
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if i did this in vi, as a script- how would i put this output to a file, like a txt file. the full vi script would be helpful. –  James Apr 27 '11 at 18:49
    
@James: I edited the answer above to capture output as well. You can copy/paste my answer into a file called checkSizes.sh and run it using bash checkSizes.sh or else first chmod +x checkSizes.sh then run it as: ./checkSizes.sh –  anubhava Apr 27 '11 at 19:06

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