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Question

In my application I create large number of instances of 'small' class that just hold some data.

I know that class creation (that is constructor call) is costly. My question is: Will it be more costly if I make this small class inherit from another class ? Some fields will just move to the superclass, so basically I'll can just use

Note: This question is specifically about performance in .NET.


Example situation and demonstration of the question

Consider this 2 cases:

1. case consists of only one class. It is the original class:

public class ShapeWithOffset{
    public double XOffset { get; private set; }
    public double YOffset { get; private set; }
    public IShape Shape{ get; private set; }

    public ShapeWithOffset(double xOffset, double yOffset, IShape shape){
        //check if arguments are correct/throw ArgumentException if not
        XOffset = xOffset;
        YOffset = yOffset;
        Shape = shape;
    }
    //equality members
}

2. case consists of 2 classes where second inherits from first. Second class ShapeWithHorizontalAndVerticalOffset provides the same function as ShapeWithOffset in 1. case.

public class ShapeWithHorizontalOffset{
    public double XOffset { get; private set; }
    public IShape Shape { get; private set; }

    public ShapeWithHorizontalOffset(double xOffset, IShape shape){
        //check if arguments are correct/throw ArgumentException if not
        XOffset = xOffset;
        Shape = shape;
    }
    //equality members
}

public class ShapeWithHorizontalAndVerticalOffset : ShapeWithHorizontalOffset{
    public double YOffset { get; private set; }

    public ShapeWithHorizontalAndVerticalOffset(double xOffset, double yOffset, 
                                                IShape shape) : base(xOffset, shape){
        //check if yOffset is correct/throw ArgumentOutOfRangeException if not
        Yffset = yOffset;
    }
    //equality members
}

My question is: Is command var foo = new ShapeWithOffset(20, 10, shape); faster then
var boo = new ShapeWithHorizontalAndVerticalOffset(20, 10, shape); ?

If I used composition instead of inheritance it would be... But what about with inheritance?

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4  
You'll save at best one function call per object instance, which is, if you forgive me the expression, peanuts in terms of performance compared to the maintainability and expressiveness you gain from inheritance. Whether or not you should actually use inheritance in your particular case, however, is quite subjective and open to debate (and that's why this is a comment and not an answer). –  Frédéric Hamidi Apr 25 '11 at 14:15
8  
This question comes up a lot on SO and it always mystifies me. That is, the question "here are two ways to write code; which is faster?" You've already written the code both ways; try it both ways and see which is faster. People seem to think that the community has some magical way of knowing which of two things is faster without trying it. There is no such magical way. Try it, measure the results, and then you'll know. –  Eric Lippert Apr 25 '11 at 14:44
8  
@drasto: Let me put it this way: I do not possess the knowledge you desire either, and I guarantee you I know more about the compiler than the considerable majority of people. When I need the answer to a performance question I write the code both ways and try it. Many years of experience have shown me that my guesses about what really makes a performance difference are frequently dead wrong. There is no magical substitute for empirical investigation. –  Eric Lippert Apr 25 '11 at 15:07
4  
@drasto: moreover, none of us possess the knowledge that you do, namely what you consider to be an important performance difference. Some people consider a difference of a few nanoseconds to be very important; some people consider a difference of ten minutes to be irrelevant. None of us can tell you what performance metrics are important to you and your customers. –  Eric Lippert Apr 25 '11 at 15:09
7  
@drasto: I don't think it is that clear. Consider for example the question of whether the base call is inlined or not. It might be, it might not be, without trying it I don't know. Now consider the performance cost of inlining; it removes one level of indirection, which is a couple of instructions, which is more time. It increases code size at the call site, which might change the layout of the code in memory, which might cause an extra cache miss. And now you've traded a single nanosecond for a potential multi-microsecond miss! How do you know if that's the case without trying it? –  Eric Lippert Apr 25 '11 at 15:49

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

This smells like premature optimization

The key words in your question are "... I think ...". If you know you have a performance problem then identify the bottleneck and optimize that. If you are anticipating a performance problem, don't! It is exceedingly unlikely that any performance bottleneck will be caused by using inheritance in the way your suggest. But, if you really want to know in advance, test in advance.

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I consider this an answer but still I want to know what if class without inheritance is faster. My application will have performance problem for sure: there is task that will run for tens of minutes and user will have to wait for. Algorithm is exponential in worst case despite all heuristics I created. And any speed up that I can make is interesting for me. But I would also like to know general answer to this: Is it faster or not ? –  drasto Apr 25 '11 at 14:22
    
I have deleted the only words "... I think ..." in my question - they were not about question but about another case (if composition was used). Context of my question has not changed. –  drasto Apr 25 '11 at 14:26
2  
+1 - premature optimization is "the root of all evil" –  Adam Rackis Apr 25 '11 at 14:48

This will be almost the same. Calling of the base .ctor will be inlined by JITter and the allocation is performed once only. It will cost you only a few bytes as an overhead.

If you are not sure, try a small benchmark.

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My experience with micro-optimizing code using a profiler is that method call overhead is negligible. My main wins for performance improvements have almost always been: caching frequently used calculations, optimizing deep inner loops (usually by using direct array indexing rather than enumeration) and avoiding unnecessary boxing. All of these are dwarfed, of course, by improving the algorithm to reduce the number of iterations (usually by introducing a heuristic than can exclude branches early or by transforming the problem into separate 'aggregate' and 'detail' phases.)

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+1 even if it does not directly answer my question because it is interesting knowledge for developing my application. I understand all you wrote except of "transforming the problem into separate 'aggregate' and 'detail' phases.". Can you explain what you meant or provide some study materials on topic link ? –  drasto Apr 25 '11 at 15:33
1  
@drasto, it heavily depends on your particular problem, but many problems can be solved at a coarse level of detail, which narrows down the particular area where a more fine-detailed analysis must occur. This is a very typical optimization in machine vision, for instance, where you can match a pattern in a lower resolution image quickly, limiting the range over which you must search for a higher resolution match. There is additional overhead to create the intermediate low-resolution images, but this is gained back by the reduced iterations required at fine detail. –  Dan Bryant Apr 25 '11 at 16:19
    
@drasto, On a side note, if you're having performance issues or need to consider them for your application, I highly recommend investing in a commercial profiling tool. There are a number of them available (JetBrains dotTrace and RedGate ANTS Profiler are two that I'm familiar with.) They will save you a lot of time and effort, since they profile the code you're actually running and give excellent feedback at a very fine level of detail. (Be sure that you're running Release build code.) You may be surprised where the bottlenecks actually turn out to be. –  Dan Bryant Apr 25 '11 at 16:30

First, as I said in my comment, calling base constructors (and virtual methods) does not affect performance enough to justify losing the maintainability and expressiveness it confers to your program. If performance really was a problem in that case, structured languages would not exist.

Now, from a design point of view, the question is reduced to whether or not inheritance is actually profitable in your case. Which prompts a question: why can't ShapeWithOffsetderive from Shape? If it was possible, I'd probably cut off the complexity and do something like:

public class ShapeWithOffset : Shape
{
    public ShapeWithOffset(double xOffset)
    : this(xOffset, 0.0) {}

    public ShapeWithOffset(double xOffset, double yOffset)
    {
        // TODO - Check if arguments are correct/throw ArgumentException if not.
        XOffset = xOffset;
        YOffset = yOffset;
    }
}

In C# 4, you can even write:

public ShapeWithOffset(double xOffset, double yOffset = 0.0)
{
    // TODO - Check if arguments are correct/throw ArgumentException if not.
    XOffset = xOffset;
    YOffset = yOffset;
}
share|improve this answer
    
ShapeWithOffset cannot derive from Shape because I simplified the code in my example. In the real code class there is no class Shape but interface IShape instead. ShapeWithOffset is in the fact generic so it is declared as: public class ShapeWithHorizontalOffset<TB> where TB: IShape. I'll edit my question to have IShape there instead of Shape to indicate it is interface. –  drasto Apr 25 '11 at 15:03
    
@drasto, the principle still stands: I'd suggest you define a class ShapeWithOffset<T> where T : IShape and go for constructor overrides instead of subclasses for your axes. Just consider you want to add the Z axis later, which way would be easier and more understandable: a whole subclass, or a constructor override? :) –  Frédéric Hamidi Apr 25 '11 at 15:08
    
Yes of course this came to my mind. Actually that was my first design. I changed it to this because there are classes in my application that position shapes in one-dimensional space (in line). There is just no y axis in for them. I thought it might by confusing if there where some YOffset property. And it wold be also useless and vast of space (as I wrote a lot of ShapeWithOffset will be created) So I created this inheritance. DO you still think they would better be one class ? –  drasto Apr 25 '11 at 15:52

talking generally about inheritance (not specifically this your case) as kuchana said in his book (design patterns) try to avoid inheritance if not necessary, because of its complexity. and i think runtime binding may cause in small performance issues, but the main overhead of inheritance is its complexity in design, that is much more important than a tiny performance issue .

EDIT

i now realize that question is about constructing :D. the following paragraph is true in java , maybe it is true in .Net too. i think, if you explicitly define constructor in your child class, it wont make any difference , because the compiler will look for a constructor in the child class first, if not found it will go up in inheritance hierarchy, till he! find the proper constructor.

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