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Look at this simple function

def prime_factors(n):
    for i in range(2,n):
      if n % i == 0:
        return i, prime_factors(n / i)
    return n

Here's the result of prime_factors(120)

(2, (2, (2, (3, 5))))

Instead of nested tuples, I want it to return one flat tuple or list.

(2, 2, 2, 3, 5)

Is there a simple way to do that?

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5 Answers

up vote 15 down vote accepted
def prime_factors(n):
  for i in range(2,n):
    if n % i == 0:
      return [i] + prime_factors(n / i)
  return [n]
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1  
Instead of creating a new list for each return value, you could pass the list as an argument and append to it. If the list gets large, this may save some space and time. –  Lars Wirzenius Feb 23 '09 at 15:37
    
A lot of time ... –  Aaron Digulla Feb 23 '09 at 16:39
3  
Considering the original algorithm, I don't think performance is crucial here :-) –  Ferdinand Beyer Feb 23 '09 at 16:58
    
Actually why would it save time and space? –  Buzzzz Feb 5 '12 at 18:17
    
@Buzzzz -- appending to a list is cheaper than merging lists into a copy. For long lists, copying is expensive. –  Ferdinand Beyer Feb 5 '12 at 18:47
show 1 more comment
def prime_factors(n):
    for i in range(2,n):
        if n % i == 0:
           yield i
           for p in prime_factors(n / i):
               yield p
           return
    yield n

Example:

>>> tuple(prime_factors(100))
(2, 2, 5, 5)
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Without changing the original function, from Python Tricks:

def flatten(x):
    """flatten(sequence) -> list

    Returns a single, flat list which contains all elements retrieved
    from the sequence and all recursively contained sub-sequences
    (iterables).

    Examples:
    >>> [1, 2, [3,4], (5,6)]
    [1, 2, [3, 4], (5, 6)]
    >>> flatten([[[1,2,3], (42,None)], [4,5], [6], 7, MyVector(8,9,10)])
    [1, 2, 3, 42, None, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]"""

    result = []
    for el in x:
        #if isinstance(el, (list, tuple)):
        if hasattr(el, "__iter__") and not isinstance(el, basestring):
            result.extend(flatten(el))
        else:
            result.append(el)
    return result
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liw.fi suggested in a comment:

Instead of creating a new list for each return value, you could pass the list as an argument and append to it. If the list gets large, this may save some space and time.

Here's an implementation of liw.fi's suggestion.

def prime_factors(n, factors=None):
    if factors is None:
        factors = []
    for i in range(2,n):
        if n % i == 0:
            factors.append(i)
            return prime_factors(n / i, factors)
    factors.append(n)
    return factors
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One gotcha, though. Because bar=[] is only initialized once, you will always append items to the same list object when calling your function with only one argument (at least in Python 2.x). Use bar=None (...) if bar is None: bar = []; instead. –  Ferdinand Beyer Feb 23 '09 at 17:01
    
Thanks! I corrected the code. –  Patrick McElhaney Feb 23 '09 at 17:08
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Just for reference (function returning array)

#/bin/python
a, b, c = 0, 0, 0

def getA():
        return "1", "1", "1"

a,b,c = getA()
print a, b, c
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Huh? How is that related to the question? –  Ferdinand Beyer Mar 17 '13 at 8:56
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