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I have been given the task of running two threads one using extends and one using implements runnable, the output is meant to be similair to this F(0) F(1) F(2) ......... S(0) S(1) S(2)

So far im getting F(0) S(1) F(1) F(2) S(2)

public class Fast implements Runnable
{

    /** Creates a new instance of Fast */

   public void run()
   {
      for(int i = 0; i <= 9; i++)
      {
       try
        {
            System.out.println("F("+ i + ")");
            Thread.sleep(200);     
        }
        catch(InterruptedException e)
        {
         String errMessage = e.getMessage();
         System.out.println("Error" + errMessage);
        }
      }
   }
}

and

public class Slow extends Thread
{

    /** Creates a new instance of Slow */

   public void run()
   {
      for(int i = 0; i <= 6; i++)
      {
        try
        {
            System.out.println("S("+ i + ")");
            Thread.sleep(400);

        }
        catch(InterruptedException e)
        {
          String errMessage = e.getMessage();
          System.out.println("Error" + errMessage);
        }
      } 
   }    
}

With the main

public class Main
{
    public static void main(String args[])
    {

      Fast f = new Fast();
      Slow s = new Slow();
      Thread ft = new Thread(f);

      ft.start();   
      s.start();

    }
}
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It seems like you want to get Slow to run after Fast? Your output is pretty much what i would expect. Eventually F will finish faster (just 2000ms) and S will still be running (2800ms). I'm not what this assignment has got to do with implementing Runnable or extending Thread since they give you the same end-result.

If you want F to finish completely before S you need to join on F first, like this:

Fast f = new Fast();
Slow s = new Slow();
Thread ft = new Thread(f);

ft.start();
ft.join();
s.start();

That will wait for ft to complete before even starting S giving you the desired output F1, F2,... S1,S2,...

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, is it not possible to use the synchronized keyword at all, I had this working and then my laptop stopped working and im trying to remember what i done, the ft.join() doesnt ring a bell –  user445714 Apr 25 '11 at 15:25
    
If you want to synchronize between the two Threads you will need to create some mutex object which they both have access to. Thread F would notify() on that mutex and Thread S would wait on it. However, i'm still not sure what you're trying to achieve. If you want to run these Threads sequentially then you need a join. If you just want F faster and S slower, then simply increase your sleep times in S. It would help to know what the purpose of the assignment is. –  alpian Apr 25 '11 at 15:41
    
Fast implements Runnable and has a run method that displays ‘F(x)’ ten times successively on new lines, sleeping for 20 milliseconds before executing each print statement. In each case the x is to be replaced by the number of the iteration, starting from 0 (i.e., the first print out is ‘F(0)’, the next is ‘F(1)’ and so on, until ‘F(9)’) ◦ Slow extends Thread and has a run method that displays ‘S(x)’ seven times successively on new lines, sleeping for 40 milliseconds before executing each print statement. –  user445714 Apr 25 '11 at 15:45
    
The x is to be replaced by the number of the iteration starting from 0 (i.e., the first print out is ‘S(0)’, the next is ‘S(1)’ and so on, until ‘S(6)’). Add statements where indicated to the main method in class Main that will create one instance of Fast and one instance of Slow and start them as concurrently executing threads. –  user445714 Apr 25 '11 at 15:45
    
Well in that case, your code is perfect, apart from the fact that it's sleeping for 200ms and 400ms respectively. With such low sleep times, there's no real guarantee what order the Threads will actually execute in. I would expect output like this: S0, F0, F1, S1, F2, F3, S2, F4, F5, etc, with all the Fs printing before the last S. –  alpian Apr 25 '11 at 15:50

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