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So I'm writing some wrapper classes for GUI programming in Win32. I'm starting with a Window class, and so far it contains a MainLoop method that is basically a clone of the standard Win32 WinMain function. That way, one can do something like this:

int WINAPI WinMain(HINSTANCE hInst, HINSTANCE hPrev, LPSTR szCmdLine, int nCmdShow) {
  Window *win = new Window();

  // Do all your widget creation and add it to the window object...

  return win->MainLoop(hInst, hPrev, szCmdLine, nCmdShow);
}

Inside the window object's MainLoop method, it must create the new Win32 window by setting its lpfnWndProc member. This member, as any Win32 programmer knows, is a function pointer to a specifically defined WndProc function. The problem is, if I were to create a WndProc function, I would need access to that window object's members (so that it knew what to draw on the window, etc.). This leaves me two options (that I know of):

  1. I can define WndProc at the top level, but that cuts off access to the object's members.

  2. I can define it as a class method, but then it's not the exact function type that lpfnWndProc asks for, so I can't set it!

Can anyone help me unravel this catch-22?

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5 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You need to create window map and when you create new window just add it to this global map. You can use simple linked list instead of course.

map<HWND, Window *> wndmap;

LRESULT CALLBACK WndProc(HWND hwnd, UINT Message, WPARAM wparam, LPARAM lparam)
{
    Window *pWnd = wndmap [hwnd];

    ....
}
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Perfect! Thanks for the elegant solution. –  Dutch Apr 25 '11 at 18:35
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You could also make it a static member function. :)
Anyways, a solution depends on if you need only one window or if you need multiple windows. First a solution for single windows:

// in .h
class Window{
public:
  static LRESULT WINAPI MessageProc(HWND hWnd, UINT msg, WPARAM wParam, LPARAM lParam);
  LRESULT InternalMessageProc(HWND hWnd, UINT msg, WPARAM wParam, LPARAM lParam);
  // ...
};

// in .cpp
#include "Window.h"

Window* global_window = 0;

Window::Window(/*...*/){
  if(!global_window)
    global_window = this;
  else
    // error or exception... or something else
}

LRESULT WINAPI Window::MessageProc(HWND hWnd, UINT msg, WPARAM wParam, LPARAM lParam){
  return global_window->InternalMessageProc(hWnd, msg, wParam, lParam);
}

Now if you want to allow multiple windows, use a std::map (or if your compiler supports std::unordered_map).
Edit: This solution comes with some subtle problems. As @Ben Voigt points out in his comment, you get a chicken and egg problem as the MessageProc is called inside of CreateWindow(Ex), but only after the CreateWindow(Ex) call you have the window handle. Here's a solution based on Ben's next comment (thanks!):

// Window.h stays the same

// in .cpp
#include "Window.h"
#include <map>

std::map<HWND, Window*> window_map;
Window* currently_created_window = 0;

Window::Window(){
  currently_created_window = this;
  window_handle = CreateWindow(/*...*/);
}

LRESULT WINAPI Window::MessageProc(HWND hWnd, UINT msg, WPARAM wParam, LPARAM lParam){
  // if the key 'hWnd' doesn't exist yet in the map
  // a new key-value pair gets created and the value gets value-initialized
  // which, in case of a pointer, is 0
  if(window_map[hWnd] == 0){
    // window doesn't exist yet in the map, add it
    window_map[hWnd] = currently_created_window;
  }
  window_map[hWnd]->InternalMessageProc(hWnd, msg, wParam, lParam);
}

Be cautious though, as the above example isn't thread-safe. You need to mutex-lock the creation of the window:

Window::Window(/*...*/){
  Lock lock_it(your_mutex);
  currently_created_window = this;
  window_handle = CreateWindow(/*...*/);
  lock_it.release();
  // rest of the initialization
}

The above should do for the thread-safety (I hope).

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The map idea should be exactly what I need. Thanks! –  Dutch Apr 25 '11 at 18:35
    
You've got a chicken and egg problem. There is no HWND until CreateWindow calls WndProc for the first time, at which point you haven't yet created the object or made an entry in the map. Missing map entry and no test for lookup failure => crash. –  Ben Voigt Apr 25 '11 at 19:11
    
@Ben: Urgh, ok, didn't know that CreateWindow(ex) already calls the registered WndProc function... thanks for letting me know. Any ideas how to work-around this? I'm currently thinking of one myself... –  Xeo Apr 25 '11 at 19:28
    
Use window_map.find(hWnd) instead, and handle the case where it's not found. If there's no polymorphism, the Window object can be created just-in-time, but usually you have to be flexible enough to allow subclasses. Also, there's a opaque pointer passed into CreateWindow and retrievable from WndProc(..., WM_CREATE, ...), but WM_CREATE is not the first message processed by the new window. –  Ben Voigt Apr 25 '11 at 19:35
    
@Ben: Thanks for your input, edited the answer accordingly. –  Xeo Apr 25 '11 at 19:54
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WndProc cannot be an instance member function, because Windows will not pass any hidden this parameter. It can be namespace scope or a static member.

One simple solution is to use a map<HWND, Window*> to find the object, and then forward parameters to a method on the object.

Note that WndProc can maintain the map itself, since CreateWindow provides an opaque user parameter that shows up in WM_CREATE which is useful for carrying the Window *, and then you remove the entry in WM_DESTROY.

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Perfect! Thanks for the elegant solution. –  Dutch Apr 25 '11 at 18:35
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Define your WndProc as a static class member - this will then be compatible (for all compilers I'm aware of) with non-member function pointer, such as those used in Win32 programming.

But I have to say that this is a bit of a waste of time - there are a zillion Windows class libraries out there, and I don't think the world really needs another one.

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The standard requires that taking the address of a static member returns an ordinary function pointer, same as taking the address of a global function. –  Ben Voigt Apr 25 '11 at 18:16
    
@Ben Sigh. I've been critiqued here and on comp.lang.c++ for suggesting this before, by some pretty weighty people too. And now I'm getting critiqued for putting in caveats. You can't win! –  nbt Apr 25 '11 at 18:22
    
AFAIK, the only way a static member function might be incompatible with a global function is if you've not specified the language linkage and the default language linkage/calling convention were different. But the compiler is supposed to catch that (no implicit conversion between pointer-to-function of different language linkages) and it's easy enough to fix by specifying the language linkage/calling convention explicitly. Perhaps others knew of major compilers which didn't comply with the standard-mandated behavior. –  Ben Voigt Apr 25 '11 at 19:18
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Sounds you need to declare the function without defining it. That's what prototypes are for.

class Object;

void f(Object* o);

class Object {
    public:
        ...
        void some_method() {
           ... &f ...
        }

        void another_method() {
           ...
        }

        ...
};

void f(Object* o) {
    ...
    o->another_method();
    ...
}

The other way around might also be possible.

class Object {
    public:
        ...
        void some_method();
        void another_method();
        ...
};

void f(Object* o) {
    ...
    o->another_method();
    ...
}

void Object::some_method() {
    ... &f ...
}

void Object::another_method() {
    ...
}
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The problem there is that lpfnWndProc must point to a function declared as LRESULT CALLBACK WndProc(HWND, UINT, WPARAM, LPARAM), which means I'm unable to pass in an object to the function. –  Dutch Apr 25 '11 at 18:14
    
@ikegami: Next time try reading the whole question, not just the title. –  Ben Voigt Apr 25 '11 at 18:15
    
@Dutch, LPARAM is a pointer. There's no problem passing an object to it. –  ikegami Apr 25 '11 at 18:47
    
@Ben Voigt, I did read the whole question. –  ikegami Apr 25 '11 at 18:48
    
@ikegami: lParam already has a well-defined message-dependent meaning, set by the OS window manager which actually calls WndProc. It's not available to hold a this pointer. –  Ben Voigt Apr 25 '11 at 19:22
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