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I have some code that needs to rescue multiple types of exceptions in ruby:

begin
  a = rand
  if a > 0.5
    raise FooException
  else
    raise BarException
  end
rescue FooException, BarException
  puts "rescued!"
end

What I'd like to do is somehow store the list of exception types that I want to rescue somewhere and pass those types to the rescue clause:

EXCEPTIONS = [FooException, BarException]

and then:

rescue EXCEPTIONS

Is this even possible, and is it possible without some really hack-y calls to eval? I'm not hopeful given that I'm seeing TypeError: class or module required for rescue clause when I attempt the above.

share|improve this question
    
What about rescue *EXCEPTIONS ? –  Roman Apr 25 '11 at 20:39
    
Thanks @sawa, clarified. –  apb Apr 25 '11 at 22:06

1 Answer 1

up vote 106 down vote accepted

You can use an array with the splat operator *.

EXCEPTIONS = [FooException, BarException]

begin
  a = rand
  if a > 0.5
    raise FooException
  else
    raise BarException
  end
rescue *EXCEPTIONS
  puts "rescued!"
end

If you are going to use a constant for the array as above (with EXCEPTIONS), note that you cannot define it within a definition, and also if you define it in some other class, you have to refer to it with its namespace. Actually, it does not have to be a constant.


Splat Operator

The splat opearator * "unpacks" an array in its position so that

rescue *EXCEPTIONS

means the same as

rescue FooException, BarException

You can also use it within an array literal as

[BazException, *EXCEPTIONS, BangExcepion]

which is the same as

[BazException, FooException, BarException, BangExcepion]

or in an argument position

method(BazException, *EXCEPTIONS, BangExcepion)

which means

method(BazException, FooException, BarException, BangExcepion)

[] expands to vacuity:

[a, *[], b] # => [a, b]

One difference between ruby 1.8 and ruby 1.9 is with nil.

[a, *nil, b] # => [a, b]       (ruby 1.9)
[a, *nil, b] # => [a, nil, b]  (ruby 1.8)

Be careful with objects on which to_a is defined, as to_a will be applied in such cases:

[a, *{k: :v}, b] # => [a, [:k, :v], b]

With other types of objects, it returns itself.

[1, *2, 3] # => [1, 2, 3]
share|improve this answer
1  
This appears to work even in ruby 1.8.7. What is the term for using the '*' character in front of EXCEPTIONS in this case? Would like to learn a bit more. –  apb Apr 25 '11 at 22:04
1  
@Andy It's called splat. It usually has the effect of decomposing an array into comma separated objects. When used in the argument receiving position of a method definition, it does the other way: put the arguments together into an array. It's quite useful in various occasions. Good to know that it works with 1.8.7. I edited my answer accordingly. –  sawa Apr 26 '11 at 0:44
9  
Note that if you want to access the exception instance, use this syntax: rescue InvalidRequestError, CardError => e (see mikeferrier.com/2012/05/19/…) –  Peter Ehrlich Oct 11 '12 at 16:37
1  
What a great explanation of the splat operator. –  Ian Vaughan Feb 8 '13 at 21:06
1  
@sawa, great explanation of splat operator. I am definitley upvoting and favouriting this answer. –  rubyprince Nov 12 '13 at 6:16

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