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Im really new to this and am now learning singly linked lists. I am writing some code but I am really confused. I am trying to write a read method and a write method. I have a test harness I cant change though. I just want to be able to read to the stream and output the stream so it doesnt come back with the memory addresses.

can anyone explain in a really simple way please and help me fix this code?

void SLLIntStorage::Read(istream& r)
{
    char c[13];
    r >> c;
    r >> NumberOfInts;

    Node *node = new Node;
    head = node; //start of linked list

    for(int i = 0; i < NumberOfInts; i++) //this reads from the file and works
    {
        r >> node->data;
        cout << node->data << endl;
        node ->next = new Node; //creates a new node
        node = node->next;
    }
}

void SLLIntStorage::Write(ostream& w)
{
    Node *node = new Node;
    head = node;

    for(int i = 0; i < NumberOfInts; i++)
    {
        w << node->data << endl;
        //cout << i << endl;
    }
}

and in the header file

#pragma once

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

struct Node
{
    int data; //data in current node
    Node *next; //link of address to next node
};

class SLLIntStorage
{

private:
    Node *head;// start of linked list
    //Node *tail;
    Node current; //current node
public:
    void setReadSort(bool);
    void sortOwn();

    void Read(istream&);
    void Write(ostream&);

    void add(int i);
    void del();

    bool _setRead;
    int NumberOfInts;

    SLLIntStorage(void);
    ~SLLIntStorage(void);
};

inline ostream& operator<< (ostream& out, SLLIntStorage& n) 
{
    n.Write(out); 
    return out;
}
inline istream& operator>> (istream& in, SLLIntStorage& s) 
{
    s.Read(in); 
    return in;
}

thank you!

share|improve this question
    
In your write method, I don't see where you are walking down the linked list. It looks like you're missing "node = node->next;" in your loop. As written, you will be writing the same integer repeatedly. –  jbruni Apr 25 '11 at 18:50
    
What is your test input and what output are you getting when you run this. One other thing is that it looks like your Write method is not iterating through the list. Just prints the same node data over and over. It also looks like your Write method sets the head node to a new node. This will clear the list. –  Mike Webb Apr 25 '11 at 18:52
    
Also, why are you creating a node in the write method? You should already have a linked list in your storage object; that is, SLLIntStorage::head. In fact, your write method causes your existing storage to get leaked when it overwrites "head" with the new node. Your write method should assume that "head" is already initialized by your read method. –  jbruni Apr 25 '11 at 18:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your write method seems a bit messed up. You want to write the elements, not create new ones. Something like this should work better:

void SLLIntStorage::Write(ostream& w)
{
    Node *node = head;

    for(int i = 0; i < NumberOfInts; i++)
    {
        w << node->data << endl;
        node = node->next;
        //cout << i << endl;
    }
}

By the way: The way your implementation seems to work for me, you have a potentially big memory leak. Once the Read method gets called twice in row, the old list is discarded without freeing the memory. You should think about what your class shall do if write is called while there is another file saved. Append it? Delete the old list first?

share|improve this answer
    
thank you! it works now! seems like such a simple things to figure out but c++ isnt my language haha –  Tanya Tazzy Hegarty Apr 25 '11 at 18:55
    
right, thanks for the heads up, I will think about this, I will also be putting a destructor in at some point which should do some work –  Tanya Tazzy Hegarty Apr 25 '11 at 18:58
1  
Another suggestion that came to my mind: If you had bothered to think about const correctness, your mistake would have been prohibited by the compiler. Your Write-method could have been void Write(ostream&) const, this way you would not have been able to assign a new value to head. –  Thilo Apr 25 '11 at 19:35

In your Write() method you clobber the entire list by doing

Node *node = new Node;
head = node;

This replaces a the entire list by an empty list if you ask me. NumberOfInts is no longer correct and you proceed to print the same node->data NumberOfInts times.

I don't know where to start.

share|improve this answer
    
But Thilo kindly provided a starting point for you :) –  sehe Apr 25 '11 at 18:54
    
Another good point... Well, there is quite a bit to do. But try to fix things one after another. Your functions also do not use the current Node class member. –  Thilo Apr 25 '11 at 18:56
    
@Thilo do they not? –  Tanya Tazzy Hegarty Apr 25 '11 at 19:00
    
Well, I am not able to see an assignment or access to the class member current. But maybe you want to implement the current member later on. For appending things at the back of the list, keeping a pointer to the last item seems like a good idea. –  Thilo Apr 25 '11 at 19:03

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