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How can I add an item to the beginning of an associative array? For example, say I have an array like this:

$arr = array('key1' => 'value1', 'key2' => 'value2');

When I add something to it as in $arr['key0'] = 'value0';, I get:

Array
(
    [key1] => value1
    [key2] => value2
    [key0] => value0
)

How do I make that to be

Array
(
    [key0] => value0
    [key1] => value1
    [key2] => value2
)

Thanks,
Tee

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marked as duplicate by hakre, hjpotter92, pilsetnieks, Freelancer, laalto May 26 '13 at 11:59

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Note that minimal code samples are much more helpful than variable dumps alone (though the latter can also be helpful). –  outis Apr 25 '11 at 22:04
    
possible duplicate of PHP prepend associative array with literal keys?. See also: PHP: Array_unshift an not numeric index. –  outis Apr 25 '11 at 22:11

5 Answers 5

up vote 75 down vote accepted

You could use the union operator:

$arr1 = array('key0' => 'value0') + $arr1;

or array_merge.

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Which is more efficient? union or array_merge? If I may ask... –  Melvin Jun 14 '13 at 6:34
2  
@melvin: Perhaps you could do a performance test and tell us. –  Vael Victus Aug 20 '13 at 20:49
1  
I'm pretty sure union is faster. –  Mathijs Segers Dec 31 '13 at 13:25
    
and array_merge didn't work with this: $years = array_merge(array('2014'=>'2014'),$years); for some reason, while the union operator did work. –  Timo Huovinen Jan 14 at 8:45
1  
@Timo Huovinen, array_merge didn't work because PHP converted your key to a number, and array_merge resets numeric keys. –  meustrus Jan 24 at 18:16

One way is with array_merge:

<?php
$arr = array('key1' => 'value1', 'key2' => 'value2');
$arr = array_merge(array('key0' => 'value0'), $arr);

Depending on circumstances, you may also make use of ksort.

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2  
It doesn't matter in this instance, but if an element with key 'key0' already existed in $arr then this value would overwrite the new value being prepended (ie. 'value0' would get overwritten). You can use the union operator (+) to resolve this. –  w3d Mar 25 '13 at 12:17
$array = array('key1' => 'value1', 'key2' => 'value2');
array_combine(array_unshift(array_keys($array),'key0'),array_unshift(array_values($array),'value0'))
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8  
+1 for being so ugly. –  outis Apr 25 '11 at 22:13
4  
The code, not the man. Were I of the appropriate gender or persuasion, I'm sure I'd find the man handsome. –  outis Apr 25 '11 at 22:14
    
Guess I just like to be that little bit different... not the cleanest or most efficient way, but just a demonstration that PHP provides a myriad of different ways to do the same thing –  Mark Baker Apr 25 '11 at 22:18
1  
Thanks for suggesting that I'm a poor coder @outis the insult is much appreciated –  Mark Baker Apr 27 '11 at 6:27
1  
@outis - You do have a well oiled tongue... two insults in the same set of commnets, and I'm still smiling –  Mark Baker Apr 28 '11 at 20:21

If you don't want to merge the arrays you could just use ksort() on the array before iterating over it.

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function unshift( array & $array, $key, $val)
{
    $array = array_reverse($array, 1);
    $array[$key] = $val;
    $array = array_reverse($array, 1);

    return $array;
}
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