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Suppose I have a series of strips of paper placed along an infinite ruler, with start and end points specified by pairs of numbers. I would like to create a list representing the number of layers of paper at points along the ruler.

For example:

strips = 
    {{-27,  20},
     { -2,  -1},
     {-47, -28},
     {-41,  32},
     { 22,  31},
     {  2,  37},
     {-28,  30}, 
     { -7,  39}}

Should output:

-47 -41 -27  -7  -2  -1   2  20  22  30  31  32  37  39
  1   2   3   4   5   4   5   4   5   4   3   2   1   0

What is the most efficient, clean, or terse way to do this, accommodating Real and Rational strip positions?

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Why didn't you list -28 in your output? If one strip ends at -28 and another starts at -28, doesn't that mean the two strips will overlap at the point 28? (I'm assuming closed intervals). –  David Carraher Apr 25 '11 at 23:37
    
@David Seems that the intervals are Open, as the last interval ends in 39, but f[39]==0 –  belisarius Apr 25 '11 at 23:42
    
@belisarius Open intervals makes sense. –  David Carraher Apr 25 '11 at 23:45
    
@David: but then shouldn't -47 be zero? –  Simon Apr 25 '11 at 23:48
1  
I assumed that they were [begin, end) type intervals so that pieces of paper can be lie flat next to each other - i.e. {{0,1},{1,2}} == {{0,2}} equivalently: [0,1) union [1,2) = [0,2). –  Simon Apr 25 '11 at 23:49
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9 Answers

Here's one approach:

Clear[hasPaper,nStrips]
hasPaper[y_, z_] := Piecewise[{{1, x <= z && x >= y}}, 0];
nStrips[y_, strip___] := Total@(hasPaper @@@ strip) /. x -> y

You can get the number of strips at any value.

Table[nStrips[i, strips], {i, Sort@Flatten@strips}]
{1, 2, 3, 3, 3, 4, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1}

Also, plot it

Plot[nStrips[x, strips], {x, Min@Flatten@strips, Max@Flatten@strips}]

enter image description here

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Here is one solution:

In[305]:= 
strips = {{-27, 20}, {-2, -1}, {-47, -28}, {-41, 32}, {22, 31}, {2, 
    37}, {-28, 30}, {-7, 39}};

In[313]:= int = Interval /@ strips;

In[317]:= Thread[{Union[Flatten[strips]], 
  Join[Count[int, x_ /; IntervalMemberQ[x, #]] & /@ (Mean /@ 
      Partition[Union[Flatten[strips]], 2, 1]), {0}]}]

Out[317]= {{-47, 1}, {-41, 2}, {-28, 2}, {-27, 3}, {-7, 4}, {-2, 
  5}, {-1, 4}, {2, 5}, {20, 4}, {22, 5}, {30, 4}, {31, 3}, {32, 
  2}, {37, 1}, {39, 0}}


EDIT Using SplitBy and postprocessing the following code gets the shortest list:

In[329]:= 
strips = {{-27, 20}, {-2, -1}, {-47, -28}, {-41, 32}, {22, 31}, {2, 
    37}, {-28, 30}, {-7, 39}};

In[330]:= int = Interval /@ strips;

In[339]:= 
SplitBy[Thread[{Union[Flatten[strips]], 
    Join[Count[int, x_ /; IntervalMemberQ[x, #]] & /@ (Mean /@ 
        Partition[Union[Flatten[strips]], 2, 1]), {0}]}], 
  Last] /. {b : {{_, co_} ..} :> First[b]}

Out[339]= {{-47, 1}, {-41, 2}, {-27, 3}, {-7, 4}, {-2, 5}, {-1, 
  4}, {2, 5}, {20, 4}, {22, 5}, {30, 4}, {31, 3}, {32, 2}, {37, 
  1}, {39, 0}}
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+1 For Interval - I hadn't seen that command before –  Simon Apr 25 '11 at 23:27
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You may regard this as a silly approach, but I'll offer it anyway:

f[x_]:=Sum[UnitStep[x-strips[[k,1]]]-UnitStep[x-strips[[k,2]]],{k,Length[strips]}]
f/@Union[Flatten[strips]]
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It's a good, clean approach - but doesn't quite return the form of the answer that Mr.W was looking for. –  Simon Apr 25 '11 at 23:44
    
Cassini, welcome to StackOverflow. –  Mr.Wizard Apr 25 '11 at 23:45
    
Thank you, Mr. Wizard! –  David Skulsky Apr 25 '11 at 23:48
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f[u_, s_] := Total[Piecewise@{{1, #1 <= x < #2}} & @@@ s /. x -> u]

Usage

f[#, strips] & /@ {-47, -41, -27, -7, -2, -1, 2, 20, 22, 30, 31, 32, 37, 39}

->

{1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 4, 5, 4, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1, 0}  

For Open/Closed ends, just use <= or <

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Here's my approach, similar to belisarius':

strips = {{-27, 20}, {-2, -1}, {-47, -28}, {-41, 32}, {22, 31}, {2, 
    37}, {-28, 30}, {-7, 39}};

pw = PiecewiseExpand[Total[Boole[# <= x < #2] & @@@ strips]]

Grid[Transpose[
  SplitBy[SortBy[Table[{x, pw}, {x, Flatten[strips]}], First], 
    Last][[All, 1]]], Alignment -> "."]

screenshot of result

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Here's my attempt - it works on integers, rationals and reals, but makes no claim to being terribly efficient. (I made the same mistake as Sasha, my original version did not return the shortest list. So I stole the SplitBy fix!)

layers[strips_?MatrixQ] := Module[{equals, points},
  points = Union@Flatten@strips;
  equals = Function[x, Evaluate[(#1 <= x < #2) & @@@ strips]];
  points = {points, Total /@ Boole /@ equals /@ points}\[Transpose];
  SplitBy[points, Last] /. {b:{{_, co_}..} :> First[b]}]

strips = {{-27, 20}, {-2, -1}, {-47, -28}, {-41, 32}, {22, 31}, 
          {2, 37}, {-28, 30}, {-7, 39}};

In[3]:= layers[strips]
Out[3]= {{-47, 1}, {-41, 2}, {-27, 3}, {-7, 4}, {-2, 5}, {-1, 4}, {2, 5}, 
         {20, 4}, {22, 5}, {30, 4}, {31, 3}, {32, 2}, {37, 1}, {39, 0}}

In[4]:= layers[strips/2]
Out[4]:= {{-(47/2), 1}, {-(41/2), 2}, {-(27/2), 3}, {-(7/2), 4}, 
          {-1, 5}, {-(1/2), 4}, {1, 5}, {10, 4}, {11, 5}, {15, 4}, {31/2, 3}, 
          {16, 2}, {37/2, 1}, {39/2, 0}}

In[5]:= layers[strips/3.]
Out[5]= {{-15.6667, 1}, {-13.6667, 2}, {-9., 3}, {-2.33333, 4}, {-0.666667, 5}, 
         {-0.333333, 4}, {0.666667, 5}, {6.66667, 4}, {7.33333, 5}, {10.,4}, 
         {10.3333, 3}, {10.6667, 2}, {12.3333, 1}, {13., 0}}
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Splice together abutting strips, determine key points where number of layers changes, and calculate how many strips each key point inhabits:

splice[s_, {}] := s
splice[s_, vals_] := Module[{h = First[vals]},
   splice[(s /. {{x___, {k_, h}, w___, {h, j_}, z___} :>  {x, {k, j}, 
       w, z}, {x___, {k_, h}, w___, {h, j_}, z___} :>  {x, {k, j}, w,
       z}}), Rest[vals]]]

splicedStrips = splice[strips, Union@Flatten@strips];
keyPoints = Union@Flatten@splicedStrips;

({#, Total@(splicedStrips /. {a_, b_} :> Boole[a <= # < b])} & /@ keyPoints)
// Transpose // TableForm


EDIT

After some struggling I was able to remove splice and more directly eliminate points that did not need checking (-28, in the strips data we've been using) :

keyPoints = Complement[pts = Union@Flatten@strips, 
   Cases[pts, x_ /; MemberQ[strips, {x, _}] && MemberQ[strips, {_, x}]]];
({#, Total@(strips /. {a_, b_} :> Boole[a <= # < b])} & /@ keyPoints)
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One approach of solving this is converting the strips

strips = {{-27, 20}, {-2, -1}, {-47, -28}, {-41, 32}
         ,{ 22, 31}, { 2, 37}, {-28,  30}, {-7, 39}}

to a list of Delimiters, marking the beginning or end of a strip and sort them by position

StripToLimiters[{start_, end_}] := Sequence[BeginStrip[start], EndStrip[end]]
limiterlist = SortBy[StripToLimiters /@ strips, First]

Now we can map the sorted limiters to increments/decrements

LimiterToDiff[BeginStrip[_]] := 1
LimiterToDiff[EndStrip[_]] := -1

and use Accumulate to get the intermediate totals of intersected strips:

In[6]:= Transpose[{First/@#,Accumulate[LimiterToDiff/@#]}]&[limiterlist]
Out[6]= {{-47,1},{-41,2},{-28,3},{-28,2},{-27,3},{-7,4},{-2,5},{-1,4}
        ,{2,5},{20,4},{22,5},{30,4},{31,3},{32,2},{37,1},{39,0}}

Or without the intermediate limiterlist:

In[7]:= StripListToCountList[strips_]:=
          Transpose[{First/@#,Accumulate[LimiterToDiff/@#]}]&[
            SortBy[StripToLimiters/@strips,First]
          ]

        StripListToCountList[strips]
Out[8]= {{-47,1},{-41,2},{-28,3},{-28,2},{-27,3},{-7,4},{-2,5},{-1,4}
        ,{2,5},{20,4},{22,5},{30,4},{31,3},{32,2},{37,1},{39,0}}
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The following solution assumes that the layer count function will be called a large number of times. It uses layer precomputation and Nearest in order to greatly reduce the amount of time required to compute the layer count at any given point:

layers[strips:{__}] :=
  Module[{pred, changes, count}
  , changes = Union @ Flatten @ strips /. {c_, r___} :> {c-1, c, r}
  ; Evaluate[pred /@ changes] = {changes[[1]]} ~Join~ Drop[changes, -1]
  ; Do[count[x] = Total[(Boole[#[[1]] <= x < #[[2]]]) & /@ strips], {x, changes}]
  ; With[{n = Nearest[changes]}
    , (n[#] /. {m_, ___} :> count[If[m > #, pred[m], m]])&
    ]
  ]

The following example uses layers to define a new function f that will compute the layer count for the provided sample strips:

$strips={{-27,20},{-2,-1},{-47,-28},{-41,32},{22,31},{2,37},{-28,30},{-7,39}};
f = layers[$strips];

f can now be used to compute the number of layers at a point:

Union @ Flatten @ $strips /. s_ :> {s, f /@ s} // TableForm

Plot[f[x], {x, -50, 50}, PlotPoints -> 1000]

example output

For 1,000 layers and 10,000 points, the precomputation stage can take quite a bit of time, but individual point computation is relatively quick:

example output

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