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I am getting a "Bus error" when I try to run this code compiled with gcc 4.2.1 on Snow Leopard

#include <stdio.h>

/*__declspec(naked)*/ void
doStuff(unsigned long int val, unsigned long int flags, unsigned char *result)
{
    __asm{
        push eax
        push ebx
       push ecx
        push edx

        mov eax, dword ptr[esp + 24]//val
        mov ebx, dword ptr[esp + 28]//flags
        //mov ecx, dword ptr[esp + 32]//result

        and eax, ebx
        mov result, eax

        pop edx
        pop ecx
        pop ebx
        pop eax

        ret
    }
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    unsigned long val = 0xAA00A1F2; 
    unsigned long flags = 0x00100001;   
    unsigned char result = 0x0;

    doStuff(val, flags, &result);   
    printf("Result is: %2Xh\n", result);

    return 0;
}

I am using the following command to compile gcc -fasm-blocks -m32 -o so so.c without any errors or warnings. I am trying to run some assembly instructions in the doStuff() function and assign the answer to result. What am I doing wrong?

Note: This worked fine in Visual Studio on Windows, but I had to comment out declspec(naked) to get gcc to compile it on Mac.

share|improve this question
    
@styfle - maybe your mac os is 64bit, and each element on the stack is 8bytes long? can you check it? –  MByD Apr 26 '11 at 1:04
    
@MByD I have a 64-bit CPU (Core 2 Duo) but the 64-bit Kernel is not enabled and that is why I needed the -m32 argument when compiling or else I get suffix or operands invalid for push errors. –  styfle Apr 26 '11 at 1:09
    
@MByD Or maybe it is enabled and that's why I needed the -m32 argument. Now I'm confused. Also, if there was an issue with the word length, wouldn't there be an error during compilation/assembly? –  styfle Apr 26 '11 at 1:20
    
@styfle - I don't know, I just tried to give a direction :) –  MByD Apr 26 '11 at 1:21
    
@MByD Well thank you for the input. Are you able to compile and run it on your machine? –  styfle Apr 26 '11 at 1:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The reason you are getting the bus error is because you are calling ret within your assembly code. ret causes the program control to transfer to the return address at the top of the stack, which you manipulate through use of push and pop. I'd highly suggest looking up what ret does in the Intel Instruction Set Reference.

Below is code that I compiled, and runs successfully, on an iMac running Mac OS X 10.6.7.

#include <stdio.h>

/*__declspec(naked)*/ void
doStuff(unsigned long int val, unsigned long int flags, unsigned char *result)
{
  __asm
    {
        push eax
        push ebx
        push ecx

        mov eax, dword ptr[ebp + 8]  //val
        mov ebx, dword ptr[ebp + 12] //flags
        mov ecx, dword ptr[ebp + 16] //result

        and eax, ebx
        mov [ecx], eax

        pop ecx
        pop ebx
        pop eax
      }
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
  unsigned long val =   0xAA00A1F2;
  unsigned long flags = 0x00100002;
  unsigned char result = 0x0;

  doStuff(val, flags, &result);
  printf("Result is: %2Xh\n", result);

  return 0;
}

Notable changes are:

  1. Removal of ret in the inline assembly
  2. Use of register ebp instead of esp to reference the parameters to doStuff
  3. Changing flags to be 0x00100002

Change (1) fixes the bus error, (2) made referencing the parameters a little more consistent, and (3) is just a quick way to make sure the function is working as expected.

Lastly, I highly recommend you become familiar with the GNU Debugger, GDB, if you haven't already. You can find more info about it at the project page http://www.gnu.org/software/gdb/ as well as information about the Mac implementation and tutorial at http://developer.apple.com/library/mac/#documentation/DeveloperTools/gdb/gdb/gdb_toc.html .

EDIT: Added basic info/link to GDB,

share|improve this answer
    
The use of ret works in Visual Studio and I thought it was required since a function call is supposed to push the return address on the stack and ret pops it off so it knows where to go after the function call. Also I have never seen ebp. All I found is ebp is different than esp because "the base pointer is manipulated only explicitly." Lastly, I have no idea what gdb is. Can you provide a link? Thanks. –  styfle Apr 26 '11 at 16:53
    
I just updated the answer with some links to GDB. I can't confirm this (I don't have Visual Studio on this machine), but my suspicion is that the reason using ret in VS worked was a result of how the compiler inserted your assembly into doStuff(). Try compiling your code with gcc -S ... to see what assembly the compiler generates. As you found out, ebp is the base pointer and it points to the bottom of the stack whereas esp points to the top. It doesn't really matter which one you use as long as you get the offsets right. –  Dean Pucsek Apr 26 '11 at 18:05

Compilers add prologues and epilogues to function calls, these prologues and epilogues take care of setting up stack frames, reserving stack space for local variables, destroying stack frames and returning to the caller.

A typical prologue for a function with no local variables when using a frame pointer may look like:

push ebp
mov ebp, esp

This saves the caller's frame pointer on the stack, and makes the current frame pointer equal to the stack pointer at function entry time.

The corresponding epilogue would be:

pop ebp
ret

which restores the previous frame pointer and returns to the caller.

If you tell gcc not to use frame pointers (-fomit-frame-pointer), the corresponding prologue will be empty, and the epilogue will just contain a ret.

That __declspec(naked) is probably similar to gcc's __attribute__((naked)) (gcc's function attributes), which only works for some architectures, and not on x86. So, on gcc, you better leave returning to the caller to the compiler, as Dean Pucsek advised you.

share|improve this answer
    
When you say prologue and epilogue, are you talking about something that happens at the beginning and end of a function that the compiler automatically does, or something that a programmer usually does? Or am I way off? –  styfle Apr 26 '11 at 22:00
    
The former (i.e. the compiler adds them). –  ninjalj Apr 26 '11 at 22:12

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