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Thanks Doug. Here's the fix:

void swap(int& a, int& b) {
    if (&a == &b) // added this check to ensure the same address is not passed in
        return;

    a ^= b;
    b ^= a;
    a ^= b;
}


I am implementing quicksort for fun in C++, and I am using integers for dummy data. I had been using the XOR swapping algorithm to swap two values in place, but I noticed my sort was screwing up. I changed my swapping algorithm and it worked. I added some debugging statements, and found that the XOR swap was doing something weird.

I printed the data before and after I swapped it, and this is what it printed:

...

swapping -5, -3
swapped  -3, -5

swapping -5, -5
swapped  0, 0     <---- What?

swapping -2, -4
swapped  -4, -2

...

Here is my code:

// this might not be that great or even work as intended but it doesn't really matter for this problem
int av3index(int a[], int indx1, int indx2, int indx3) {
    if (a[indx3] <= max(a[indx1], a[indx2]) && a[indx3] >= min(a[indx1], a[indx2]))
        return indx3;

    if (a[indx2] <= max(a[indx1], a[indx3]) && a[indx2] >= min(a[indx1], a[indx3]))
        return indx2;

    if (a[indx1] <= max(a[indx2], a[indx3]) && a[indx1] >= min(a[indx2], a[indx3]))
        return indx1;
}

void swap(int& a, int& b) {
    /*
    This works
    int tmp = b;
    b = a;
    a = tmp;*/

    cout << "swapping " << a << ", " << b << endl;

    a ^= b;
    b ^= a;
    a ^= b;

    cout << "swapped  " << a << ", " << b << endl << endl;
}

void zqsort(int a[], int len) {
    if (len <= 1)
        return;

    int pivot = av3index(a, 0, len / 2, len - 1);

    swap(a[pivot], a[0]);

    int i = 1, j = len - 1;

    while (i <= j) {
        if (a[i] > a[0]) {
            while (i <= j && a[j] > a[0])
                --j;

            if (i <= j)
                swap(a[i], a[j]);
        }

        ++i;
    }

    swap(a[0], a[j]);

    zqsort(a, len / 2);
    zqsort(a + len / 2, len - len / 2);
}

int main() {
    int values[] = {5, 4, 3, 2, 1, 0, -1, -2, -3, -4, -5};

    int len = sizeof(values) / sizeof(int);

    int* arr = new int[len];

    for (int i = 0; i < len; ++i)
        arr[i] = values[i];

    zqsort(arr, len);

    cout << "sorted array:" << endl;
    for (int i = 0; i < len; ++i)
        cout << arr[i] << endl;

    cin.get();
}

I didn't use any references for the quicksort code so it might be wrong, but I don't think that's germane to the problem.

share|improve this question
3  
Using this XOR might actually be slower than the usual two value swap using a temp variable; the fact that you are writing through references suggests you are forcing the compiler to do 3 memory (ok, cache line) writes, whereas temp-style swamp should only do two memory write (any intelligent compiler will put the temp in the registers). Adding the conditional check surely makes it slower. So while this might be fun, it probably isn't a practical thing to do in a sort. –  Ira Baxter Apr 26 '11 at 2:23
    
true, but xor swap isn't meant to speed up, but to avoid temporary. In this case, I'd say the ultimate reason is to have fun. –  Michael Krelin - hacker Apr 26 '11 at 10:16
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3 Answers

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Your swap a and b are the same location. The XOR hack only works when they are different locations.

I think in C; here's a table:

           &a != &b  &a == &b
           *a   *b   *a   *b
           -5   -5   -5   -5
*a ^= *b;   0   -5    0    0
*b ^= *a;   0   -5    0    0
*a ^= *b;  -5   -5    0    0
share|improve this answer
    
Why downvote? It's the likeliest reason. –  Michael Krelin - hacker Apr 26 '11 at 2:02
    
Even though this answer was voted down, it is actually correct. It made me realize that at some point the swap function gets the same address. Thanks. –  Tom Sykes Apr 26 '11 at 2:02
    
Accept the answer, Tom Sykes ;-) –  Michael Krelin - hacker Apr 26 '11 at 2:05
    
Have to wait a few more minutes :) –  Tom Sykes Apr 26 '11 at 2:07
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In addition to the existing answers, I'll just add that if you're going to do a test before swapping then you might as well change:

if (&a == &b) // added this check to ensure the same address is not passed in
    return;

to:

if (a == b) // check that values are different
    return;

This will handle the case where &a == &b and also the case where a == b, which may save some unnecessary swapping.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, but why do you refer to "correct answers" in plural? :) Also, I wonder if comparing values will not turn actually slower (not necessarily noticeably, but in theory) — you will have to dereference pointers and I'd assume that in most cases the values are different, so you'll go for swapping, anyway ;-) –  Michael Krelin - hacker Apr 26 '11 at 10:15
    
If the OP uses the xor swap, he must test for a==b otherwise he will destroy the data. –  Jeff Paquette Apr 26 '11 at 10:33
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Anything xor'd with itself is zero.

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