Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So. I compile a .jar file. I know I have the Manifest correct. The main class is called "Boot." Whenever I try to run the .jar, I get the following error: Could not find the main class: <classdir>.Boot. Program will exit. I have no idea what is causing it. Also, I found something strange: If I open the file with 7-zip (alternative to WinZip) and navigate to the main class, there isn't a file called Boot.class. There are two files: Application.class and Application$1.class. Does anyone have an idea as to what is happening and how to fix? :\

EDIT I just realized that there was another .java in the directory as Boot.java was called Aplication.java. So I guess Boot.java just isn't getting compiled? :\

share|improve this question
1  
How are you creating the jar? - By the way, it's a bad idea to have classes in the default package (that is classes that don't have a package statement at the top). –  MeBigFatGuy Apr 26 '11 at 2:47
    
Are you sure your manifest is correct? Assume it is correct, and if Boot.class is the main class, are you sure you build your jar properly? –  anta40 Apr 26 '11 at 2:48
    
What IDE are you using? Did you set the main class in the project properties? –  travega Apr 26 '11 at 2:49
    
I know that the manifest is correct. Main-Class: <director>.Boot Name: org/rsbot Sealed: true Specification-Title: "blah" Specification-Vendor: "org.blah" Implementation-Title: "blah" Implementation-Vendor: "org.blah" –  anonymous Apr 26 '11 at 2:49
1  
"I know I have the Manifest correct." 1) At this stage, that is a rash assumption. 2) Please always copy/paste compile & run-time error messages. 3) When you do that, make sure they are 'code formatted' using either the ` character (for in-line code formatting) or the {} button for code blocks. I am guessing that most people did not realize that class name had a <classdir> package! 4) Class names that include the $ symbol generally mean anonymous inner classes are declared. 5) Manifest files must end in a blank line. Make sure yours has one. –  Andrew Thompson Apr 26 '11 at 3:00
show 5 more comments

1 Answer

You should check if any of these work:

  • "java -jar your.jar Boot"
  • unpack the jar file (any unzip will work), cd into the root folder, and run it with "java Boot"

This will tell you if the Manifest was wrong or the Boot.java wasn't there. Then fix as appropriate.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.