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Instead of doing:

git push origin --all && git push nodester --all && git push duostack --all

Is there a way to do that with just one command?

Thanks :)

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See also: stackoverflow.com/q/5620525/223092 –  Mark Longair Apr 26 '11 at 7:08

4 Answers 4

up vote 20 down vote accepted

Unix:

git remote | xargs -l git push --all

OSX:

git remote | xargs -L1 git push --all

Or if you want to push a specific branch:

# Replace master with the branch you want to push
for r in $(git remote); do git push $r master; done
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1  
Very good and simple solution. BTW you can use xargs -l instead of -L 1, the -l option is the same as -L 1. Also, sometimes I add --all to the git push. git remote | xargs -l git push --all –  Tony Jun 18 at 13:34
    
I get xargs: illegal option -- l on OSX. Figured it out, you need git remote | xargs -L1 git push –  balupton Aug 24 at 22:45

Create an all remote with several repo URLs to its name:

git remote add all origin-host:path/proj.git
git remote set-url --add all nodester-host:path/proj.git
git remote set-url --add all duostack-host:path/proj.git

Then just git push all --all.


This is how it looks in .git/config:

  [remote "all"]
  url = origin-host:path/proj.git
  url = nodester-host:path/proj.git
  url = duostack-host:path/proj.git
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1  
Is this a feature or a bug? –  manojlds Apr 26 '11 at 3:44
3  
Why would it be a bug? –  Adam Dymitruk Apr 26 '11 at 6:44
6  
@manojlds: It’s documented. –  Aristotle Pagaltzis Apr 27 '11 at 1:43
2  
Super cool trick! The only disadvantage is that it does not move remote heads. You need to run git fetch --all right after doing such push. –  madhead Mar 25 '13 at 20:42
3  
Mr. Torvalds (creator of Git) mentions that he uses this method, but he states that it is merely for convenience and offers no technical advantage marc.info/?l=git&m=116231242118202&w=2 "And in the end, even a "git push all" that pushes to multiple repositories will actually end up connecting once for each repository, so it's really just a shorthand for doing multiple "git push"es. There's no real technical advantage, just a convenience." –  Matt Aug 15 '13 at 3:39

As a CLI Alternative to editing the .git/config file, you could use the following commands:

# git remote add all origin-host:path/proj.git
# git remote set-url --add all nodester-host:path/proj.git
# git remote set-url --add all duostack-host:path/proj.git

The same git push all --all works here as well.

You have accomplished the same as answer #1. You have just done it with Command Line instead of raw editing of the config file.

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I wrote a short bash function to push to many remotes in one call. You can specify a single remote as a parameter, multiple remotes separated by spaces or don't specify any to have it push to all remotes.

This can be added to your .bashrc or .bash_profile.

function GitPush {
  REMOTES=$@

  # If no remotes were passed in, push to all remotes.
  if [[ -z "$REMOTES" ]]; then
    REM=`git remote`

    # Break the remotes into an array
    REMOTES=$(echo $REM | tr " " "\n")
  fi

  # Iterate through the array, pushing to each remote
  for R in $REMOTES; do
    echo "Pushing to $R..."
    git push $R
  done
}

Example: Let's say your repo has 3 remotes: rem1, rem2 and rem3.

# Pushes to rem1
GitPush rem1

# Pushes to rem1 and rem2
GitPush rem1 rem2

# Pushes to rem1, rem2 and rem3
GitPush
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