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I have been facing this problem for a while now and it is really starting to frustrate me.

I have an array A which is constantly being updated. Lets say A = [1,2,3,4,5]. I need to make an exact duplicate copy of A and call it B. If A were to change to [6,7,8,9,10], B should still be [1,2,3,4,5]. What is the best way to do this? I tried a for loop like:

for(int i=0; i<5; i++){
   B[i]=A[i]
}

but that doesn't seem to be working correctly? Please help? And please don't use advanced terms like deep copy etc because I do not know what that means.

Thanks

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2  
how are you initializing A and B? –  Hristo Apr 26 '11 at 4:01
2  
Can someone explain to me what's wrong with B = A.clone(); –  Boris Treukhov Jul 23 '13 at 11:02
1  
@BorisTreukhov: it will probably only work for primitives - it's fine in this case but the title is "Make copy of array Java" - anyway someone suggested it –  Mr_and_Mrs_D Jul 28 '13 at 13:08
    
@Mr_and_Mrs_D What do you mean by "work". The only pro is that you can reuse existing memory, the cons are that it's more verbose and not compile-time typesafe. But for creating a defensive copy of an array of immutables clone() is nobrainer I wonder why the former collected thrice many upvotes. I can't get where I'm mistaking, sorry. –  Boris Treukhov Jul 28 '13 at 14:19

6 Answers 6

You can try using System.arraycopy()

int[] a = new int[]{1,2,3,4,5};
int[] b = new int[5];

System.arraycopy( a, 0, b, 0, a.length );
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33  
+1 for not reinventing the wheel... –  squawknull Apr 26 '11 at 4:10
    
+1 for not reiventing the wheel. And as far as I know it, this solution is the faster you can get in array copying. –  Felipe Hummel Apr 26 '11 at 4:22
2  
both clone and arraycopy are native. I'd expect clone to be marginally faster. not that the difference matters. –  MeBigFatGuy Apr 26 '11 at 4:33
2  
@Felipe, @MeBigFatGuy - only for a large array. For a small array, a copy loop may be faster because of the setup overheads. If you look at the javadoc for System.arraycopy, you'll see that the method needs to check various things before it starts. Some of these checks are unnecessary with a copy loop, depending on the static array types. –  Stephen C Apr 26 '11 at 4:34
    
@Stephen C, hmmm, but with a copy loop every element load and store needs to do bounds checking. This is just a one time check with System.arraycopy. –  MeBigFatGuy Apr 26 '11 at 4:40

you can use

int[] a = new int[]{1,2,3,4,5};
int[] b = a.clone();

as well.

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I'm just clearing the OP's point that: "If A were to change to [6,7,8,9,10], B should still be [1,2,3,4,5]". OP said he tried using loop but doesn't worked for him. –  Harry Joy Apr 26 '11 at 4:17
8  
The cast is unnecessary; a good static analyzer will warn about it. But cloning is definitely the best way to make a new copy of an array. –  erickson Apr 26 '11 at 4:23
1  
@MeBigFatGuy - the OP's use-case entails repeated copying to the same array, so clone doesn't work. –  Stephen C Apr 26 '11 at 4:36
1  
@Stephen C, i didn't read that. I just read he wants a copy, and will then subsequently be repeatedly updating the non-stashed version. –  MeBigFatGuy Apr 26 '11 at 4:41
1  
@MeBigFatGuy - he said "I have an array A which is constantly being updated.". Maybe I'm reading too much into that, but I take this as implying that he is repeatedly copying A to B as well. –  Stephen C Apr 26 '11 at 4:54

If you want to make a copy of

int[] a = {1,2,3,4,5};

this is the way to go

int[] b = Arrays.copyOf(a, a.length);

Arrays.copy may be faster than a.clone() on small arrays. Both copy elements equally fast but clone() returns Object so compiler has to insert an implicit cast to int[], you can see it in the bytecode, something like this

ALOAD 1
INVOKEVIRTUAL [I.clone ()Ljava/lang/Object;
CHECKCAST [I
ASTORE 2
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I have a feeling that all of these "better ways to copy an array" are not really going to solve your problem.

You say

I tried a for loop like [...] but that doesn't seem to be working correctly?

Looking at that loop, there's no obvious reason for it not to work ... unless:

  • you somehow have the a and b arrays messed up (e.g. a and b refer to the same array), or
  • you're application is multi-threaded and different threads are reading and updating the a array simultaneously.

In either case, alternative ways of doing the copying won't solve the underlying problem.

The fix for the first scenario is obvious. For the second scenario you will have to figure out some way of synchronizing the threads. Atomic array classes don't help because they have no atomic copy constructors or clone methods, but synchronizing using a primitive mutex will do the trick.

(There are hints in your question that lead me to think that this is indeed thread related; e.g. your statement that a is constantly changing.)

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agreed .. probably true. –  MeBigFatGuy Apr 26 '11 at 5:04

All solution that call length from array, add your code redundant null checkersconsider example:

int[] a = {1,2,3,4,5};
int[] b = Arrays.copyOf(a, a.length);
int[] c = a.clone();

//What if array a comes as local parameter? You need to use null check:

public void someMethod(int[] a) {
    if (a!=null) {
        int[] b = Arrays.copyOf(a, a.length);
        int[] c = a.clone();
    }
}

I recommend you not inventing the wheel and use utility class where all necessary checks have already performed. Consider ArrayUtils from apache commons. You code become shorter:

public void someMethod(int[] a) {
    int[] b = ArrayUtils.clone(a);
}

Apache commons you can find there

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How about this way, where :

String a[] = new String[]{"Hello","Hi","faridi","yello","this works"};
String c[] = new String[]{"yello","tis works"};

String b[] = a;

for (int i = 0; i < b.length; i++) {

    System.out.println(b[i]);

    } 

b = c;
for (int i = 0; i < b.length; i++) {

    System.out.println(b[i]);

    }



}

The first printf loop will give you the following:

Hello
Hi
faridi
yello
this works

The second one will give you:

yello
this works
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