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I have a class hierarchy where __init__ in class Base performs some pre-initialization and then calls method calculate. The calculate method is defined in class Base, but it's expected to be redefined in derived classes. The redefined calculate will use some of the attributes that are only available in class Derived:

class Base:
    def __init__(self, args):
        # perform some pre-initialization
        ...
        # now call method "calculate"
        self.calculate()

class Derived(Base):
    def __init__(self, args, additional_attr):
        super().__init__(args)
        # do some work and create new instance attributes
        ...
        self.additional_attr = additional_attr

This is not going to work because calculate method in class Derived will be invoked before self.additional_attr is assigned.

I can't move super().__init__(args) call to the end of the __init__ method because some of the work it does has to happen before processing additional_attr.

What to do?

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There are lots of crazy ways to fix this, but no sane ones. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Apr 26 '11 at 5:51
5  
Perhaps you shouldn't have the calculate() call in your constructor then. If you can't construct a derived object by allowing the base constructor to complete first, then you must be doing something wrong IMHO. –  Jeff Mercado Apr 26 '11 at 5:55
    
I think it's OO abuse to have a specialized calculate() method which depends on subclass attributes which will not exist in the base class. Crossdependencies by construction. What is the compelling argument against splitting the functionality into Derived.additional_calculate() from Base.calculate()? We can give Base.additional_calculate() an empty body. (Or at very minimum, improve handling the as-yet-nonexistence of the additional data to be more graceful?) –  smci Jul 22 '11 at 12:02

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Perhaps you shouldn't have the calculate() call in your constructor then. If you can't construct a derived object by allowing the base constructor to complete first, then you must be doing something wrong IMHO. A sensible approach would be to move that call out of the constructor and perhaps create a factory method to make that call automatically. Then use that method if you need precalculated instances.

class Base(object):
    def __init__(self, args):
        # perform some initialization
        pass
    def calculate(self):
        # do stuff
        pass
    @classmethod
    def precalculated(cls, args):
        # construct first
        newBase = cls(args)
        # now call method "calculate"
        newBase.calculate()
        return newBase

class Derived(Base):
    def __init__(self, args, additional_attr):
        super(Derived, self).__init__(args)
        # do some work and create new instance attributes
        self.additional_attr = additional_attr
    @classmethod
    def precalculated(cls, args, additional_attr): # also if you want
        newDerived = cls(args, additional_attr)
        newDerived.calculate()
        return newDerived

newBase = Base('foo')
precalculatedBase = Base.precalculated('foo')
newDerived = Derived('foo', 'bar')
precalculatedDerived = Derived.precalculated('foo', 'bar')
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This is bad design, IMHO, and you're obusing the object system of Python. Consider that in other OO languages like C++, you don't even have control over the creation of base classes. The derived class's constructor calls the base constructor before your code runs. Such behavior is almost always expected of well-behaved class hierarchies, and changing it can only lead to problems.

Sure, you can do some patching (such as assigning self.additional_attr before the call to super's constructor, or other tricks), but the better way would be to change your design so that it won't require such hacks. Since you've presented an abstract example here, it's hard to give more comprehensive design advice.

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Can you pass the additional_attr as a parameter to __init__ method of base class and propogate it from there to calculate method?

Say something like:

class Base(object): 
    def __init__(self, args,additional_attr): 
        print 'Args for base class:%s' %(args)
        self.calculate(additional_attr)

class Derived(Base):
    def __init__(self, args, additional_attr):
        super(Derived,self).__init__(args,additional_attr)

     def calculate(self,val):
         print 'Arg for calculate:%s' %(val)
         self.additional_attr = val
>>> d = Derived(['test','name'],100)
Args for base class:['test', 'name']
Arg for calculate:100

This is roundabout way, but with no information about what the pre-initialisation steps are, it is hard to say whether the above approach would help you.

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Helped out with the formatting, just indent code blocks with 4 spaces and it should be formatted correctly for you. No need to use <code> blocks. ;) –  Jeff Mercado Apr 26 '11 at 10:02

In order for something like this to work, you need to design a protocol that allows the base and derived class(es) to cooperate with each other to accomplish the object initialization task:

class Base:
    def __init__(self, args, *additional_args):
        # perform some pre-initialization
        # ...

        # perform any futher initialization needed by derived classes
        self.subclass_setup(*additional_args)

        # now call method "calculate"
        self.calculate()

    def subclass_setup(self, *args):
        pass

class Derived(Base):
    def __init__(self, args, additional_attr):
        super().__init__(args, additional_attr)

    def subclass_setup(self, additional_attr):
        # do some work and create new instance attributes
        # ...
        self.additional_attr = additional_attr
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