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Is it possible to define a global variable in a JavaScript function?

I want use the trailimage variable (declared in the makeObj function) in other functions.

<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
    <head id="Head1" runat="server">
        <title></title>
        <script type="text/javascript">
            var offsetfrommouse = [10, -20];
            var displayduration = 0;
            var obj_selected = 0;
            function makeObj(address) {
                **var trailimage = [address, 50, 50];**
                document.write('<img id="trailimageid" src="' + trailimage[0] + '" border="0"  style=" position: absolute; visibility:visible; left: 0px; top: 0px; width: ' + trailimage[1] + 'px; height: ' + trailimage[2] + 'px">');
                obj_selected = 1;
            }

            function truebody() {
                return (!window.opera && document.compatMode && document.compatMode != "BackCompat") ? document.documentElement : document.body;
            }
            function hidetrail() {
                var x = document.getElementById("trailimageid").style;
                x.visibility = "hidden";
                document.onmousemove = "";
            }
            function followmouse(e) {
                var xcoord = offsetfrommouse[0];
                var ycoord = offsetfrommouse[1];
                var x = document.getElementById("trailimageid").style;
                if (typeof e != "undefined") {
                    xcoord += e.pageX;
                    ycoord += e.pageY;
                }
                else if (typeof window.event != "undefined") {
                    xcoord += truebody().scrollLeft + event.clientX;
                    ycoord += truebody().scrollTop + event.clientY;
                }
                var docwidth = 1395;
                var docheight = 676;
                if (xcoord + trailimage[1] + 3 > docwidth || ycoord + trailimage[2] > docheight) {
                    x.display = "none";
                    alert("inja");
                }
                else
                    x.display = "";
                x.left = xcoord + "px";
                x.top = ycoord + "px";
            }

            if (obj_selected = 1) {
                alert("obj_selected = true");
                document.onmousemove = followmouse;
                if (displayduration > 0)
                    setTimeout("hidetrail()", displayduration * 1000);
            }
        </script>
    </head>
    <body>
        <form id="form1" runat="server">
        <img alt="" id="house" src="Pictures/sides/right.gif" style="z-index: 1; left: 372px;
            top: 219px; position: absolute; height: 138px; width: 120px" onclick="javascript:makeObj('Pictures/sides/sides-not-clicked.gif');" />
        </form>
    </body>
</html>
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4  
to declare a global simply don't use the "var" keyword –  Ibu Apr 26 '11 at 6:46
5  
@Ibrahim: "to declare a global simply don't use the "var" keyword" Gak! The Horror! ;-) Thankfully, strict mode does away with implicit globals. –  T.J. Crowder Apr 26 '11 at 7:22
8  
@Ibrahim Diallo - not using var doesn't declare a global variable. A consequence of assigning a value to an undeclared variable is the creation of a property on the global object, which is quite different to declaring a variable. –  RobG Apr 26 '11 at 7:34
    
useful info in this answer, too stackoverflow.com/a/4862268/1356098 :) –  Erenor Paz Nov 26 '12 at 15:35
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12 Answers

up vote 169 down vote accepted

Yes, as the others have said, you can use var at global scope (outside of all functions) to declare a global variable:

<script>
var yourGlobalVariable;
function foo() {
    // ...
}
</script>

Alternately, you can assign to a property on window:

<script>
function foo() {
    window.yourGlobalVariable = ...;
}
</script>

...because in browsers, all global variables are properties of the window object.

(There's also the horror of implicit globals, but don't do it on purpose and do your best to avoid doing it by accident.)

All that said: I'd avoid global variables if you possibly can (and you almost certainly can). As I mentioned, they end up being properties of window, and window is already plenty crowded enough what with all elements with an id (and many with just a name) being dumped in it (and regardless that upcoming specification, IE dumps just about anything with a name on there).

Instead, wrap your code in a scoping function and use variables local to that scoping function, and make your other functions closures within it:

<script>
(function() { // Begin scoping function
    var yourGlobalVariable; // Global to your code, invisible outside the scoping function
    function foo() {
        // ...
    }
})();         // End scoping function
</script>
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16  
+1 Explicitly declaring it to window is the most readable way. –  Caspar Kleijne Apr 26 '11 at 6:48
1  
The best way is window. Thank you –  user1408366 Aug 1 '12 at 10:38
    
Thank you for the answer this is a good summary. Cheers –  Dax Nov 18 '13 at 21:21
    
Note that using window won't work in Node. The easiest trick here is to set: GLOBAL.window = GLOBAL; -- as explained in this related question. Of course, it's not pretty conceptually. I prefer to do things the other way around, so I can use GLOBAL instead of window. –  Domi Apr 5 at 21:58
    
@ Ilyas Mimouni: Your proposed edit (appropriately rejected by three other reviewers) suggests you may want to read up on var: Poor, misunderstood var. –  T.J. Crowder May 23 at 14:28
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One thing that no one said literally :) In javascript You don't declare vars. You ONLY define them :)

In C where You have strong typing You have declaration:

int myVar; // when you declare the type of your var

and definition

myVar = 10; // when you define the value

...and to answer the main question. DEFINE variable before your function. This will work and it will comply to the good practice of declaring your variables at the top of the scope :)

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3  
If You want to define your variables elsewhere be sure to understand what hoisting is. Here is a very nice article about it adequatelygood.com/2010/2/JavaScript-Scoping-and-Hoisting. Good luck! –  op1ekun Dec 29 '12 at 10:55
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Just declare

var trialImage;

outside. Then

function makeObj(address) {
    trialImage = [address, 50, 50];
..
..
}

Hope this helps.

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It is very simple define the trailimage variable outside the function and set its value in makeObj function. Now you can access its value from anywhere.

var offsetfrommouse = [10, -20];
var displayduration = 0;
var obj_selected = 0;
var trailimage;
function makeObj(address) {
      trailimage = [address, 50, 50];
      ....
}
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Just declare it outside the functions, and assign values inside the functions. Something like:

<script type="text/javascript">
    var offsetfrommouse = [10, -20];
    var displayduration = 0;
    var obj_selected = 0;
    var trailimage = null ;  // GLOBAL VARIABLE
    function makeObj(address) {
        trailimage = [address, 50, 50];  //ASSIGN VALUE

Or simply removing "var" from your variable name inside function also makes it global, but it is better to declare it outside once for cleaner code. This will also work:

var offsetfrommouse = [10, -20];
var displayduration = 0;
var obj_selected = 0;

function makeObj(address) {
    trailimage = [address, 50, 50];  //GLOBAL VARIABLE , ASSIGN VALUE

I hope this example explains more: http://jsfiddle.net/qCrGE/

var globalOne = 3;
testOne();

function testOne()
{
    globalOne += 2;
    alert("globalOne is : " + globalOne );
    globalOne += 1;
}

alert("outside globalOne is : " + globalOne);

testTwo();

function testTwo()
{
    globalTwo = 20;
    alert("globalTwo is " + globalTwo);
    globalTwo += 5;
}

alert("outside globalTwo is :" + globalTwo);
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No, you can't. Just declare the variable outside the function. You don't have to declare it at the same time as you assign the value:

var trailimage;
function makeObj(address) {
  trailimage = [address, 50, 50];

Edit: edit.

share|improve this answer
    
Why the downvote? If you don't explain what it is that you think is wrong, it can't improve the answer. –  Guffa Nov 15 '13 at 20:09
    
Sorry! "Is it possible to define a global variable in a JavaScript function?" -- "No, you can't" isn't correct, as the first answer shows! –  mustafa.0x Nov 17 '13 at 7:29
1  
@mustafa.0x: You are mistaken. You can't define a global variable inside a function. You can implicitly create a global variable, or create a window property inside a function, but you can't define a global variable inside a function. –  Guffa Nov 17 '13 at 13:22
    
With regards to JavaScript in a browser environment, a global variable and a property of window are synonymous. Either way, the semantic distinction you're making is clear, so I don't mind un-downvoting. Edit: unable to change my vote, sorry! –  mustafa.0x Nov 18 '13 at 19:05
    
@mustafa.0x: I have made an edit to the answer, that should allow you. –  Guffa Nov 18 '13 at 20:08
show 1 more comment
    var Global = 'Global';

    function LocalToGlobalVariable() {

    //This creates a local variable.

    var Local = '5';

    //Doing this makes the variable available for one session
    //(a page refresh - Its the session not local)

    sessionStorage.LocalToGlobalVar = Local;

    // It can be named anything as long as the sessionStorage references the local variable.
    // Otherwise it won't work
    //This refreshes the page to make the variable take effect instead of the last variable set.

    location.reload(false);
    };

    //This calls the variable outside of the function for whatever use you want.

    sessionStorage.LocalToGlobalVar;

I realize there is probably a lot of syntax errors in this but its the general idea... Thanks so much LayZee for pointing this out... You can find what a local and session Storage is at http://www.w3schools.com/html/html5_webstorage.asp. I have needed the same thing for my code and this was a really good idea.

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Within the scope of a function leaving var away assigns a 'global' variable, that is to say, a variable that exists in the global namespace (window). Global variables thus are properties of window, which mean you can define them as window[varname] and simply check for there existence using if (window[varname]) { ... }. So in your case:

if (!window.trailimage) {
  trailimage = [10, -20];
  //or
  window.trailimage = [10, -20];
}
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if you are making a startup function, you can define global functions and variables in such way:

function(globalScope)
{
     //define something
     globalScope.something() { 
         alert("It works");
     };
}(this)

Because the function is invoked globally with this argument, this is global scope here. So, the something should be a global thing.

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Nowadays, there's also the option of using the WebStorage API

localStorage.foo = 42;

or

sessionStorage.bar = 21;

Performancewise, I'm not sure whether it is noticeably slower than storing values in variables.

Widespread browser support as stated in

http://caniuse.com/namevalue-storage
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http://www.dofactory.com/javascript-singleton-pattern.aspx

use singleton design pattern have single instance across the all the files.

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Everybody here who said "just declare it outside the functions, and assign values inside the functions." is totally wrong! And should read this article to learn javascript!

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Right source, wrong link. The explanation of the differences is located here: finding improper globals –  Greg Dec 12 '13 at 22:06
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