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I need to create a program that calculates how many ways you can add three numbers so that they equal 1000.

I think this code should work, but it doesn't write out anything. What am I doing wrong? Any tips or solution?

using System;

namespace ConsoleApp02
{
    class Program
    {
        public static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            for(int a = 0; a < 1000; a++)
            {
                for(int b = 0; b < 1000; b++)
                {
                    for(int c = 0; c < 1000; c++)
                    {
                        for(int puls = a + b + c; puls < 1000; puls++)
                        {
                            if(puls == 1000)
                            {
                                Console.WriteLine("{0} + {1} + {2} = 1000", a, b, c);
                            }
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
            Console.ReadKey(true);
        }
    }
}
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What's the inner-most loop for? –  Juliet Feb 23 '09 at 18:42
    
That's how a homework question should be asked. :-) –  Franci Penov Feb 23 '09 at 18:46
    
Two thumbs up for being honest that it is a homework assignment. :) –  Dana Holt Feb 23 '09 at 18:57
    
Can numbers repeat? Is "1 + 1 + 998" a valid answer? –  Benjamin Autin Feb 23 '09 at 19:03
    
Does the order of the numbers matter? For example does 100,300,600 count as 1 or do each 6 permutations each count as valid solutions? –  JB King Feb 23 '09 at 19:22

11 Answers 11

Your innermost loop (iterating the puls variable) doesn't really make any sense, and because of the condition on it (puls < 1000) Console.WriteLine never runs.

Perhaps you should test whether A + B + C is 1000, instead.

Also, you'll find that you might be missing a couple particular combinations of numbers because of the bounds on your loops (depending on the problem statement.)

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+1 for helping but not doing his homework for him. –  Cj Anderson Feb 23 '09 at 18:44
    
Thanks! I tried to word my answer thoughtfully. –  mquander Feb 23 '09 at 18:46
    
OK, I'll bite, what combinations are missing? I'm assuming only positive integers for A, B, and C. –  Bob King Feb 23 '09 at 18:49
    
He didn't really make it clear whether 0 was allowed or not, so they might not really be missing. I qualified my response as such. –  mquander Feb 23 '09 at 18:52
    
Yeah, perhaps natural numbers? –  codemeit Feb 23 '09 at 18:54

On a separate note, this particular implementation, while it'll work (with the modifications suggested by the other answers), is quite a performance hit, as the complexity of your algorithm is O(n^3). In other words, you are going through the innermost check one bilion times.

Here's a hint how you can optimize it to at least O(n^2) or just one milion iterations: for each pair of a and b generated by the two outer for loops, there's only one value for c that will result in 1000.

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Also worth noting is that if a + b + c = 1000, then b + a + c also equals 1000. So you can probably cut out a lot of values by only checking for values of b that are >= a. –  Kibbee Feb 23 '09 at 19:13
    
Lol, I didn't want to give him all the hints, just to nudge his mind in the right direction... :-) –  Franci Penov Feb 23 '09 at 19:18

Question doesn't specify that negative numbers are not allowed. Answer is infinite.

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You don't need the inner loop.

if (a+b+c == 1000)
   write
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In your final inner loop, "int puls = a + b + c; puls < 1000; puls++" you're ensuring that puls never = 1000, if puls is not less than 1000, it kicks out of the loop. That is why you are getting no values. But rethink your logic some as well.

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If you get this assignment as a computer science student, you'd probably want to solve this using Dynamic Programming.

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Once the inner most loop gets to 1000, it breaks out of the for loop and never even checks if it is 1000 in the 'if' statement.

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That code will return no answer.

The interior for loop adds a + b + c and puts the result into puls. However, you stop the loop before puls can get to 1000, and then test inside the for statement to see if puls equals 1000. So, you won't get an answer.

Just test puls against 1000 in the inner loop. Why?

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You can replace your innermost for loop with just a test for if (a+b+c == 1000) {...}. Then you can add optimizations like - once a sum has been found with a combination, there is no need to continue with the inner loop.

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The code does not cover the following cases

  • 1000 + 0 + 0
  • 0 + 10000 + 0
  • 0 + 0 + 10000

The inner most loop should be an if rather for.

You don't need {} if there is only one statement in the loop or if clause.

EDIT: Removed code answers

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Please, oh please, don't omit the {}. ;) –  hometoast Feb 23 '09 at 19:22
    
because I'm lazy when I want to add another line. –  hometoast Feb 26 '09 at 15:43

Try this:

{
    for(a=0;a<=500;a++)
    { 
        for (b=a;b<=500;b++)
        {
            c=1000-(a+b);
            count
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