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at work I encountered a basic problem when trying to implement a configuration script with Scheme. To avoid the need of inventing an artificial and restricted language the script should contain actual code. This code shall be evaluated later on. To make the configuration work as desired it has to have access to certain variables. These variables are only known in the context of the evaluation. Therefore the configuration script has to be evaluated in the current environment. Here is a primitive example of what I am talking about:

(let ((a #t))
  (wr "a is ..."
    (eval '(if a "true" "false"))))

When running this code I'd always get an error message telling me that the variable 'a' is unknown. So the question is: Do you know how to evaluate frozen code inside the current environment?

P.S.: I use the bigloo compiler.

///////////////////////////////////////////// EDIT: //////////////////////////////////////////////////////

When using the approach suggested by Chris I came to another interesting problem, the usage of the case keyword. The following two examples both use the same case construction which should trigger the output of a "yes!" line. Unfortunately they behave differently.

Usual -> output is "yes!" as expected:

  (define testit "test")
  (case testit
    (("test")
     (begin (newline) (write "yes!") (newline)))
    (else
      (begin (newline) (write "no!") (newline)))))

With eval -> output is surprisingly "no":

  (define env (null-environment 5))
  (eval '(define testit "test") env)
  (eval '(case testit
           (("test")
            (begin (newline) (write "yes!") (newline)))
           (else
            (begin (newline) (write "no!") (newline))))) 

Does that make any sense?

share|improve this question
    
Re your edit: Don't use strings in case match clauses. I know some/many Scheme implementations that output "no" in both cases. Only symbols, numbers, characters, booleans, and the empty list (()) can be reliably written in a case's matches. See stackoverflow.com/questions/5768696/… for more details. –  Chris Jester-Young May 22 '11 at 14:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

eval cannot access lexical variables, such as those defined using let.

Instead, you have to create an environment, and populate it with the variables you want to make available. For example:

(define env (null-environment 5))
(eval '(define a #t) env)
(wr "a is ..."
    (eval '(if a "true" "false") env))
share|improve this answer
    
Hey, that actually worked, thank you! I'm curious if there is a shorter or more direct way to define the variable a inside env, maybe something that omits the evaluation of the "'(define.." expression - like: (define a #t env). I am also wondering how time consuming the evaluation of such eval constructions is. –  Bastian Apr 27 '11 at 7:18
    
By the R5RS report (and the R7RS report), the environment returned by (null-environment 5) may be immutable. So the proposed solution is not portable. –  Marc Jan 7 '14 at 21:39

To answer your edit, you aren't passing env as an argument to the last eval. testit doesn't exist in the environment that eval creates if that argument isn't given.

That may be a typo, but if not, that's your problem.

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