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Im preparing a program for my teacher friends using vb 2010 express. They keep records about their students. I prepared a database that contains a table named "Mystudents". It has columns like "studentId , Name, Surname, etc.." . My problem starts here. Each student attends lots of lessons during a year. I must keep "which lessons they attended", "when they attended", "which topic done in the lessons" for each students. for example

Id: 104 Name : Jason Surname : Black Class : 10A on 12.04.2011 he attended math lesson and they do trigonomtry on 14.04.2011 he attended physics lesson and they do gravity ....... .......

Id: 105 Name : Marry Surname : Steward Class : 11B on 02.04.2011 she attended math lesson and they do trigonomtry on 14.04.2011 he attended physics lesson and they do gravity ....... ........

i mean i have a list of data for each record of databese. Please halp me..?

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5 Answers 5

In a relational database design, you would typically include a "relation table" to keep track of this:

   --------------
   |  Student   |
   --------------
         | 1
         |      
         | 0..*
--------------------
| Students_Lessons |
--------------------
         | 0..*
         |
         | 1
   --------------
   |   Lesson   |
   --------------

The Student table have StudentID as primary key, the Lesson table has LessonID as primary key, and the Students_Lessons table contains the two columns StudentID and LessonID which will link students to lessons.

As you see in the database design above, each record in the Student table can be linked to zero or more records in the Students_Lessons table. The same goes for the Lesson table; each record can be linked to zero or more records in the Students_Lessons table. However, each record in the Students_Lessons table must be linked to exactly one record in Student, and one record in Lesson.

If each student may attend each lesson once only, you can extend the Students_Lessons table with additional columns for any other information that you require, otherwise it's probably better to extend the data model with additional tables for storing more information.

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thank you alot....:) –  Caravansary Apr 26 '11 at 9:16

If I'm not wrong, you're looking for a 1-N and M-N relationship.

Best suggestion would be you should learn more about database design. You can start googing what's a 1-N and M-N relationship in relational databases.

You're looking to support that in VB, but this is out of .NET scope but it's a database design thing :)

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What is the question?

Try to write down all the properties/entities you'd like to store in your database. Based on that, you can perform some normalization to achieve the optimal database structure.

For example: a student's got an id, name and surname. Those properties belong together in a students table.

Further; a student will follow lessons. But this is not a 1:1 relationship. So in the first place you'll get a table 'lessons' where all lessons are defined, after that you'll get a StudentsLessons table where the link between lessons and the students attended is created.

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You are right. "StudentsLessons table" is useful, but it will have so many data during a year. (there are about 300 students and each will get about 100 lessons during year. so there will be 30000 records in StudentsLessons table) it will be hard to make a search in the future. So i want my program creates a new table for each student that user added. If it is not possible i will do your advice..(StudentsLessons table) –  Caravansary Apr 26 '11 at 9:07
    
But a database is optimized for tables with a lot of records. You can speed up searching by using indexes on the important fields (most of the time PK/FK's). Your idea of a separate table is possible, but I'd not advise it because of maintenance issues. –  Rhapsody Apr 26 '11 at 9:10

I would use 3 tables.

students

student_id    student name .. etc ..
1             jane doe
2             jack dee


lessons

lesson_id    lesson_name   .. etc..
1            gravity 101
2            hard maths
3            hampsters  

student_lessons

student_id    lesson_id
1             1
1             2
1             3

Google-ing database design stuff like "normal form", "1 to many", "many to many" and "many to 1" relationships would help you here.

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thanks alot..:)) –  Caravansary Apr 26 '11 at 9:15
    
glad to help. please use the upvote / accept answer tools as appropriate.. –  trickwallett Apr 26 '11 at 9:24
    
vote up requires 15 rep. but i have no:) –  Caravansary Apr 26 '11 at 21:26
CREATE TABLE student
        (
        id INT NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY,
        firstName NVARCHAR(200),
        lastName NVARCHAR(200),
        )

CREATE TABLE subject
        (
        id INT NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY,
        subjectName NVARCHAR(200)
        )

CREATE TABLE class
        (
        id INT NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY,
        subjectId INT NOT NULL
                FOREIGN KEY
                REFERENCES subject,
        classDate DATE,
        topic NVARCHAR(200)
        )

CREATE TABLE student_class
        (
        studentId INT NOT NULL
                FOREIGN KEY
                REFERENCES student,
        classId INT NOT NULL
                FOREIGN KEY
                REFERENCES class,
        PRIMARY KEY (studentId, classId)
        )
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3  
Absolutely: he's an student and I don't like this kind of answers. It's just a "I want N" and you gave the solution without letting him learn how to think the right solution. In instance, you don't know exactly which database technology is using. You're assuming is SQL Server, and, by the way, this question should be answered in terms of teaching database relationships :) –  Matías Fidemraizer Apr 26 '11 at 9:01
1  
@Matias: do I get you right: you think the solution is correct but downvoting it because of the fact that it, in your opinion, does not educate the op sufficiently? –  Quassnoi Apr 26 '11 at 9:05
    
@Quassnoi You know it's not the right solution since you don't know database technology behind the question. And yes, I downvote it, because an answer shouldn't be "hey, this is the source code!". You didn't explain why this is the solution, and you know question author's has low database design knowledge, so, do you think this is a solution for him? Maybe he doesn't understand it! What a solution haha :D –  Matías Fidemraizer Apr 26 '11 at 9:24
    
@Matías: do I get you right: you think the author is not able to ask for clarification if he does not understand something, and "you should learn" and "start googling" would be a better answer than a source code with a comment form below it? –  Quassnoi Apr 26 '11 at 9:29
1  
@Quassnoi Nevermind. –  Matías Fidemraizer Apr 26 '11 at 14:08

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