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Can anyone please tell me how to read only the first 6 months(7 columns) for each year of the data below using read.table()?

Year   Jan  Feb  Mar  Apr  May  Jun  Jul  Aug  Sep  Oct  Nov  Dec   
2009   -41  -27  -25  -31  -31  -39  -25  -15  -30  -27  -21  -25
2010   -41  -27  -25  -31  -31  -39  -25  -15  -30  -27  -21  -25 
2011   -21  -27   -2   -6  -10  -32  -13  -12  -27  -30  -38  -29
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5  
It's duplicate of Ways to read only select columns from a file into R?, Dirk mention about NULL as column class in his answer. – Marek Apr 26 '11 at 10:19
    
up vote 99 down vote accepted

Say the data are in file data.txt, you can use the colClasses argument of read.table() to skip columns. Here the data in the first 7 columns are "integer" and we set the remaining 6 columns to "NULL" indicating they should be skipped

> read.table("data.txt", colClasses = c(rep("integer", 7), rep("NULL", 6)), 
+            header = TRUE)
  Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun
1 2009 -41 -27 -25 -31 -31 -39
2 2010 -41 -27 -25 -31 -31 -39
3 2011 -21 -27  -2  -6 -10 -32

Change "integer" to one of the accepted types as detailed in ?read.table depending on the real type of data.

data.txt looks like this:

$ cat data.txt 
"Year" "Jan" "Feb" "Mar" "Apr" "May" "Jun" "Jul" "Aug" "Sep" "Oct" "Nov" "Dec"
2009 -41 -27 -25 -31 -31 -39 -25 -15 -30 -27 -21 -25
2010 -41 -27 -25 -31 -31 -39 -25 -15 -30 -27 -21 -25
2011 -21 -27 -2 -6 -10 -32 -13 -12 -27 -30 -38 -29

and was created by using

write.table(dat, file = "data.txt", row.names = FALSE)

where dat is

dat <- structure(list(Year = 2009:2011, Jan = c(-41L, -41L, -21L), Feb = c(-27L, 
-27L, -27L), Mar = c(-25L, -25L, -2L), Apr = c(-31L, -31L, -6L
), May = c(-31L, -31L, -10L), Jun = c(-39L, -39L, -32L), Jul = c(-25L, 
-25L, -13L), Aug = c(-15L, -15L, -12L), Sep = c(-30L, -30L, -27L
), Oct = c(-27L, -27L, -30L), Nov = c(-21L, -21L, -38L), Dec = c(-25L, 
-25L, -29L)), .Names = c("Year", "Jan", "Feb", "Mar", "Apr", 
"May", "Jun", "Jul", "Aug", "Sep", "Oct", "Nov", "Dec"), class = "data.frame",
row.names = c(NA, -3L))

If the number of columns is not known beforehand, the utility function count.fields will read through the file and count the number of fields in each line.

## returns a vector equal to the number of lines in the file
count.fields("data.txt", sep = "\t")
## returns the maximum to set colClasses
max(count.fields("data.txt", sep = "\t"))
share|improve this answer
3  
+1 For being so quick and preventing me from making a fool of myself by saying it can't be done. – Andrie Apr 26 '11 at 9:08
    
@Andrie always a pleasure ;-) – Gavin Simpson Apr 26 '11 at 9:10
2  
@Andrie fortune(109) – James Apr 26 '11 at 10:20
1  
@Benjamin Read the first couple of lines from the file using argument nrows. Then work out how many columns there are using ncol(), or however else you want to work out the number of columns to read/ignore. Then read the full file using this info. – Gavin Simpson Nov 29 '12 at 0:42
1  
?? If you don't know the number of columns how else are you going to determine it without reading a bit of it to deduce how many there are? – Gavin Simpson Nov 29 '12 at 0:45

To read a specific set of columns from a dataset you will just have to specify these columns with the select parameter from fread from the data.table package. You can specify the columns with a vector of column names or column numbers.

For the example dataset:

library(data.table)
data <- fread("data.txt", select = c("Year","Jan","Feb","Mar","Apr","May","Jun"))
data <- fread("data.txt", select = c(1:7))

Alternatively, you can use the drop parameter to indicate which columns should not be read:

data <- fread("data.txt", drop = c("Jul","Aug","Sep","Oct","Nov","Dec"))
data <- fread("data.txt", drop = c(8:13))

All result in:

> data
  Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun
1 2009 -41 -27 -25 -31 -31 -39
2 2010 -41 -27 -25 -31 -31 -39
3 2011 -21 -27  -2  -6 -10 -32

Another alternative is the read.csv.sql function from the sqldf package:

data <- read.csv.sql("data.txt",
                     sql = "select Year,Jan,Feb,Mar,Apr,May,Jun from file",
                     sep = "\t")
share|improve this answer
    
fread does not support compressed files, however. Large files are usually compressed. – Deleet Feb 28 at 9:03
    
read.table and readLines both read compressed files. – Deleet Feb 28 at 9:56
    
There is a feature request for enabling this in fread. Worth noticing is that fread will highly probably read the uncompressed file considerably faster than read.table will read the compressed file. See here for an example. – Procrastinatus Maximus Feb 28 at 10:44
    
Some uncompressed files are too large. E.g. I'm working with 1000 Genomes files. They can be 60 GB uncompressed. – Deleet Feb 28 at 10:45
    
As you probably know, R reads the data in memory. Whether you read the zipped file or the unzipped file doesn't make a difference on the size of the resulting data in memory. If you have 60GB in files, read.table won't save you. In that case, you might want to look at the ff-package. – Procrastinatus Maximus Apr 20 at 8:42

You could also use JDBC to achieve this. Let's create a sample csv file.

write.table(x=mtcars, file="mtcars.csv", sep=",", row.names=F, col.names=T) # create example csv file

Download and save the the CSV JDBC driver from this link: http://sourceforge.net/projects/csvjdbc/files/latest/download

> library(RJDBC)

> path.to.jdbc.driver <- "jdbc//csvjdbc-1.0-18.jar"
> drv <- JDBC("org.relique.jdbc.csv.CsvDriver", path.to.jdbc.driver)
> conn <- dbConnect(drv, sprintf("jdbc:relique:csv:%s", getwd()))

> head(dbGetQuery(conn, "select * from mtcars"), 3)
   mpg cyl disp  hp drat    wt  qsec vs am gear carb
1   21   6  160 110  3.9  2.62 16.46  0  1    4    4
2   21   6  160 110  3.9 2.875 17.02  0  1    4    4
3 22.8   4  108  93 3.85  2.32 18.61  1  1    4    1

> head(dbGetQuery(conn, "select mpg, gear from mtcars"), 3)
   MPG GEAR
1   21    4
2   21    4
3 22.8    4
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Here is how I read the first seven columns:

data <- read.table("data.txt")
data[1:7]
share|improve this answer
2  
You are right that with this you end up with only the first seven columns in the data frame. However, this still means that the complete file is read first, which, for large files costs a lot of time and RAM. Therefore, the colClasses option is better. – ph0t0nix Oct 5 '15 at 9:55

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