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As MSDN mentions:

The code in a Finally block runs after a Return statement in a Try or Catch block is encountered, but before that Return statement executes. In this situation, a Return statement in the Finally block executes before the initial Return statement. This gives a different return value. To prevent this potentially confusing situation, avoid using Return statements in Finally blocks.

As I didn't understand a lot from this note, I'll take an example (VB.NET, I think in C# is the situation is similar):

Try
    HugeOp()
    Return "OK"
Catch
    Return "NOK"
Finally
    Return "Finally"
End Try

Now, why should be this illegal in both C# and VB.NET?

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what happens when you run it? –  Mitch Wheat Apr 26 '11 at 9:03
1  
As I always recommend, just make a small test program to emulate the case and see for yourself. –  Dmitry Apr 26 '11 at 9:04
3  
it is illegal in C# (edit: and, it seems, VB) –  Marc Gravell Apr 26 '11 at 9:04
2  
@serhio ah, then MSDN is confusing ; a better remark in MSDN would be "avoid using Return statements in Finally blocks, else your code won't compile"; I have annotated MSDN to this effect. –  Marc Gravell Apr 26 '11 at 9:06
3  
An interesting side note: this is not illegal in JavaScript. function m() { try { return 1; } finally { return 2; } } a call to m() will return 2. Implementing that was a real pain for the development team. It's also legal in Java. –  Eric Lippert Apr 16 '13 at 15:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

It's illegal because when you reach the Finally block, the value to return is already defined ("OK" if everything went well, "NOK" if an exception was caught). If you were able to return a different value from the Finally block, this value would always be returned, whatever the outcome of the instructions above. It just wouldn't make sense...

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thank you. So "Finally" should be the return value. Made illegal to "de-confuse" the code. –  serhio Apr 26 '11 at 9:17
1  
No, the return value is set before the return statement is executed. Inbetween those two things, the finally block is executed. It therefore makes no sense to have a return statement in a finally block. It doesn't make sense to say that finally "should" be the return value because it doesn't makes sense for finally to have a return value. –  izb Apr 26 '11 at 9:22
    
@izb: In other words, in my success case, the compiler takes "OK" as return value, executes the Finally block, then takes the "OK" and effectively returns it? –  serhio Apr 26 '11 at 9:26
10  
The specification could define the behavior of return in a finally statement however it likes. It could return the old return value, the new return value or be illegal. Any if these behaviors is possible, and they chose to make it illegal. And I agree with that decision. –  CodesInChaos Apr 26 '11 at 9:58
    
@CodeInChaos +1. Good point. –  serhio Apr 26 '11 at 11:12

I was curious about this, I'm running VS2010 and does not allow a Return in the finally block. here is the code I compiled

Public Class Class1
   Public Shared Function test() As String
      Try
         Return "OK"
      Catch ex As Exception
         Return "Catch"
      Finally
         test = "Finally"
      End Try
   End Function
End Class

I compiled the DLL to view the MSIL it looked rather interesting the above code basically gets refactored to this:

Public Class Class2
   Public Shared Function test() As String
      Try
         Try
            test = "OK"
         Catch ex As Exception
            test = "Catch"
         End Try
      Finally
         test = "Finally"
      End Try

      Return test
   End Function
End Class

and testing this out, the MSIL for the above two classes is exactly the same.

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so, finally, you found a way to return in finally block in Visual Basic, using the function's name, even if confusing, there is a way to do it... –  serhio Apr 21 '13 at 7:27

I guess the answer is in the question. It's illegal because it's confusing. It's not intuitive which value will be returned. If it's illegal, you are forced to write code where the flow is much clearer.

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"confusing", "intuitive", but really what should be the return here after the compiler rules? Is it always "Finally"? –  serhio Apr 26 '11 at 9:12
1  
Looks like the compiler rules state it's illegal and shouldn't compile. So the question what it does return makes no sense. –  CodesInChaos Apr 26 '11 at 9:16
    
@CodeInChaos: read the note I posted. "This gives a different return value." –  serhio Apr 26 '11 at 9:19
    
You're note is obviously inaccurate and doesn't describe the behavior of either C# or VB.net. That's why @MarcGravell suggested that the documentation should be updated to be consistent with the actual behavior of the compiler. –  CodesInChaos Apr 26 '11 at 9:31
1  
Making it a warning would violate the spec. "8.9.4 The return statement" - "It is a compile-time error for a return statement to appear in a finally block" (From the C# specification) –  CodesInChaos Apr 26 '11 at 9:56

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