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I am reading some C++ text. In an example, the text written:

class Student {
     int no;
     char grade[M+1];
 public:
     Student();
     Student(int, const char*);
     const Student& set(int, const char*);
     void display() const;
 };

Student::Student() {
    no = 0;
    grade[0] = '\0';
 }

 Student::Student(int n, const char* g) { 
     *this = Student(); // initialize to empty
     set(n, g);         // validate, reset if ok
 }

I don't understand this line: *this = Student();

Why do we have to do that, while just calling Student(); also makes the default constructor invoked? Thanks

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4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

It's not possible to call the default constructor directly (C++ FAQ). ie.

Student::Student(int n, const char* g){
Student();
set(n, g); // validate, reset if ok
}

doesn't work. However I'm not sure about the solution you have, either.

*this = Student()

will call Student::operator=(const Student&). In this particular class it's OK (that function is the default member copy) but it might not be in general, because the Student object is only 'partly constructed' when that method is called.

Better to have a private init function

void Student::init() {
 no = 0;     
 grade[0] = '\0';
}

and call it from both constructors.

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Although, imho, it would be better to use common initialization function, something like this:

class Student {
    (...)
    private:
        void initMe();
 };

 Student::Student() {
    initMe();
 }

 Student::Student(int n, const char* g) { 
     initMe(); // initialize to empty
     set(n, g);         // validate, reset if ok
 }


void Student::initMe() {
    no = 0;
    grade[0] = '\0';
 }

That would avoid unnecessary creation of objects.

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It constructs a temporary Student object, and then copies it to *this. I would just initialize the member variables to empty in the second constructor though. The idea is that you don't have to write the same code that initializes the member variables as empty twice though, but it is quite trivial problem here.

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this is bad advice. Duplication is bad. Where it is trivially avoidable it's especially unforgiveable. Stick to the code in the question and when you need to extend the class you only need to add initialisation in a single place. –  David Heffernan Apr 26 '11 at 10:04
    
You could also add a private init() method for the default values and call it from all constructors, saving the overhead of constructing a temporary object. –  Torp Apr 26 '11 at 10:07
    
ok, I know little of the details of c++ constructors. But I know duplication of code is bad and if a private init is the best way to achieve that then it's the way to go. –  David Heffernan Apr 26 '11 at 10:27
    
David I did not try to advocate code duplication, I merely meant in this trivial case it'd be fine to just use the constructor's initializer list to initialize the member variables instead of unnecessarily constructing an empty object. For any non-trivial initialization or well there would be code duplication, you obviously should separate it to its separate initialization method to avoid duplication. –  reko_t Apr 26 '11 at 11:28

*this = Student(); is just to initialize the member variables with respect to default constructor called. Such design should be avoided, as it creates temporary and copies it contents.

Use something like below:

void reset() {   // introduce this method inlined in the class
    grade[no = 0] = '\0';
}

Student::Student() {
  reset();   // call it when needed
 }

 Student::Student(int n, const char* g) { 
     reset(); // initialize to empty
     set(n, g);         // validate, reset if ok
 }
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