Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Are there some advices about how I should deal with the IDisposable object sequences?

For example, I have a method that builds a IEnumerable<System.Drawing.Image> sequence and at some point I would need to dispose that objects manually, because otherwise this might lead to some leaks.

Now, is there a way to bind the Dispose() call to garbage collector actions, because I want these objects disposed right in the moment they are no longer accessible from other code parts?

**Or maybe you could advice me some other approach? **


Generally, this seems to be the same problem as it comes, for example, in unmanaged C++ without shared pointers, where you can have a method:

SomeObject* AllocateAndConstruct();

and then you can't be sure when to dispose it, if you don't use code contracts or don't state something in the comments.

I guess the situation with disposable objects is pretty the same, but I hope there is an appropriate solution for this.

share|improve this question
2  
GC doesnt collect garbage immedeatly after it is no longer accessible. It may took a while for such objects to be collected –  Stecya Apr 26 '11 at 9:59

7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You should design your system in a way that you know when the resources are no longer needed. In the worst case, they'll be eventually disposed when the garbage collector gets to it, but the point of IDisposable is that you can release important resources earlier.

This "earlier" is up to you to define, for example, you can release them when the window that's using them closes, or when your unit of work finishes doing whatever operations on them. But at some point, some object should "own" these resources, and therefore should know when they're no longer needed.

share|improve this answer

(from the question)

Now, is there a way to bind the Dispose() call to garbage collector actions, because I want these objects disposed right in the moment they are no longer accessible from other code parts?

GC doesn't happen immediately when your object goes out of scope / reach; it is non-deterministic. By the time GC sees it, there is no point doing anything else (that isn't already handled by the finalizer), as it is too late.

The trick, then, is to know when you are done with it, and call Dispose() yourself. In many cases using achieves this. For example you could write a class that implements IDisposable and encapsulates a set of Images - and wrap your use of that encapsulating object with using. The Dispose() on the wrapper could Dispose() all the images held.

i.e.

using(var imageWrapper = GetImages()) {
    foreach(var image in imageWrapper) {
         ...
    }
    // etc
} // assume imageWrapper is something you write, which disposes the child items

however, this is a bit trickier if you are displaying the data on the UI. There is no shortcut there; you will have to track when you are done with each image, or accept non-deterministic finalization.

share|improve this answer

If you want to determiniscally dispose of the objects in the collection, you should call Dispose on each:

myImages.ToList().ForEach(image => image.Dispose());

If you don't do this, and if your objects become unreachable, the GC will eventually run and release them.

Now, if you don't want to manually code the Dispose calls, you can create a wrapper class that implements IDisposable and use it through a using statement:

using (myImages.AsDisposable()) { 
  // ... process the images
}

This is the needed "infrastructure":

public class DisposableCollectionWrapper<D> : IDisposable
where D : IDisposable {

  private readonly IEnumerable<D> _disposables;

  public DisposableCollectionWrapper(IEnumerable<D> disposables) {
    _disposables = disposables;
  }

  public void Dispose() {
    if (_disposables == null) return;
    foreach (var disposable in _disposables) {
      disposable.Dispose();
    }
  }

}

public static class CollectionExtensions {

  public static IDisposable AsDisposable<D>(this IEnumerable<D> self)
  where D : IDisposable {
    return new DisposableCollectionWrapper<D>(self);
  }

}

Also notice that this is not the same as the situation you described with C++. In C++, if you don't delete your object, you have a genuine memory leak. In C#, if you don't dispose of your object, the garbage collector will eventually run and clean it up.

share|improve this answer

You can use the 'using' block, to make sure, the IDisposable is disposed as soon the block is left. The compiler does encapsulate such blocks into try - finally statements in order to make sure, Dispose is called in any case when leaving the block.

By using a finalizer, one can make the GC call the Dispose method for those objects which where "missed" somehow. However, implementing a finalizer is more expensive and decreases the garbage collection efficiency - and possibly the overall performance of your application. So if any possible, you should try to make sure to dispose your IDisposables on your own; deterministically:

public class Context : IDisposable {

    List<IDisposable> m_disposable = new List<IDisposable>();
    public void AddDisposable(IDisposable disposable) {
        m_disposable.Add(disposable); 
    }

    public void Dispose() {
        foreach (IDisposable disp in m_disposable)
            disp.Dispose(); 
    }

    // the Context class is used that way: 
    static void Main(string[] args) {

        using (Context context = new Context()) {
            // create your images here, add each to the context
            context.AddDisposable(image); 
            // add more objects here 

        } // <- leaving the scope will dispose the context
    }
}

By using some clever design, the process of adding objects to the context may can get even more easier. One might give the context to the creation method or publish it via a static singleton. That way, it would be available for child method scopes as well - without having to pass a reference to the contex around. By utilizing that scheme it is even possible, to simulate an artificial destructor functionality like f.e. known from C++.

share|improve this answer

The neat method would be to create your own generic collection class that implements IDisposable. When this collection class is Disposed() ask for each element if it implements IDisposed, and if so Dispose it.

Example (look elsewhere if you don't know about the IDisposable pattern)

public class MyDisposableList<T> : List<T> : IDisposable
{
    private bool disposed = false;

    ~MyDisposableList()
    {
        Dispose(false);
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        Dispose(true);
    }

    protected void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        if (!disposed)
        {
            foreach (T myT in this)
            {
                IDisposable myDisposableT = myT as IDisposable;
                if (myDisposableT != null)
                {
                    myDisposableT.Dispose();
                }
                myT = null;
            }
            disposed = true;
        }
    }
    ...
}

usage:

using (MyDisposableList<System.Drawing.Bitmap> myList = new ...)
{
    // add bitmaps to the list (bitmaps are IDisposable)
    // use the elements in the list
}

The end of the using statement automatically Disposes myList, and thus all bitMaps in myList By the way: if you loaded the bitmap from a file and you forgot to Dispose() the bitmap you don't know when you can delete that file.

share|improve this answer

The neat method would be to create your own generic collection class that implements IDisposable. When this collection class is Disposed() ask for each element if it implements IDisposed, and if so Dispose it.

Example (look elsewhere if you don't know about the IDisposable pattern)

public class MyDisposableList<T> : List<T> : IDisposable
{
    private bool disposed = false;

    ~MyDisposableList()
    {
        Dispose(false);
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        Dispose(true);
    }

    protected void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        if (!disposed)
        {
            foreach (T myT in this)
            {
                IDisposable myDisposableT = myT as IDisposable;
                if (myDisposableT != null)
                {
                    myDisposableT.Dispose();
                }
                myT = null;
            }
            this.Clear();
            this.TrimExcess();
            disposed = true;
        }
    }
    ...
}

usage:

using (MyDisposableList<System.Drawing.Bitmap> myList = new ...)
{
    // add bitmaps to the list (bitmaps are IDisposable)
    // use the elements in the list
}

The end of the using statement automatically Disposes myList, and thus all bitMaps in myList By the way: if you loaded the bitmap from a file and you forgot to Dispose() the bitmap you don't know when you can delete that file.

share|improve this answer

You can call GC.Collect() if you really was to dispose those objects right away but to my understanding it is up to the GC to decide whether to collect the memory.
This in turn will call the Finalize() method for each object that should be released.
Note that if the collection goes out of scope the GC will eventually collect the memory used by the images.
You can also use the using construct if you use a collection that implements IDisposeable. That will guarantee that the objects will be disposed exactly when the collection goes out of scope (or nearly after the end of the scope).

share|improve this answer
    
Why the downvote? –  the_drow Apr 26 '11 at 10:06
3  
This answer is plain wrong. 1. Calling GC.Collect() is bad practice and MS discourages this. 2. GC.Collect does not call Dispose, it calls Finalize, but certainly not during that call to GC.Collect. 3. While GC will eventually clean up the memory, this is often much to late when dealing with large block of unmanaged memory, as is with images. This could easily result in out of memory exceptions. –  Steven Apr 26 '11 at 10:10
    
@Steven the last part of your comment is plain wrong ;). Calling GC manually will in no way delay any garbage collections. Besides that OOM do not have to do with calling GC, it will certainly not increase the risk of getting OOM. –  user492238 Apr 26 '11 at 10:25
    
@user492238: I didn’t mean that calling GC.Collect increases the risk of getting OOM, but that not calling Dispose() on an object does and that GC.Collect doesn't make this much better. Okay, you got me.. in fact it does make things ‘better’ ;-), because the finalizer of such object will typically run sooner, and with this it lowers the chance of having an OOM. Still, remember that the GC will not collect objects that implement a finalizer and didn't get disposed right away. It takes a collect of a higher generation or another GC.Collect call to really clean those objects. –  Steven Apr 26 '11 at 10:43
    
@the_drow: Your update is better, but is still a bit misleading. You shouldn't advice the OP to call GC.Collect but just let him call Dispose or use the using keyword. –  Steven Apr 26 '11 at 10:46

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.