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I have app that uses Settings. To save settings I use:

Properties.Settings.Default.Save();

To read tham I use:

Properties.Settings.Default.MyCustomSetting;

In my folder with application I have only exe file. No config files. My application works good, can read write settings.

Where is that file located if it is not in application folder?

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duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/481025/… –  V4Vendetta Apr 26 '11 at 11:04
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3 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

On My Windows XP machine, the settings are saved in a file called user.config somewhere under either C:\Documents and Settings\<UserName>\Application Data\ or C:\Documents and Settings\<UserName>\Local Settings\Application Data\

Update:

On Windows Vista and later, the locations have changed to C:\Users\<UserName>\AppData\Roaming\ and C:\Users\<UserName>\AppData\Local\

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This depends on what SettingsProvider you are using. By default, this is the LocalFileSettingsProvider

Quoting from that page:

Application-scoped settings and the default user-scoped settings are stored in a file named application.exe.config, which is created in the same directory as the executable file. Application configuration settings are read-only. Specific user data is stored in a file named user.config, stored under the user's home directory.

They may also go to the %APPDATA%

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I don't know the specifiek path but i think it's in documents and settings Place a breakpoint on the Save and the path should be visable in one of the members/submembers of Properties.Settings.Default

see this post

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