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I am creating a simple program to learn about the java Comparator class. I have sorted an arraylist into order but now I want to sort the list in descending order but am having problems in where to call the .reverseOrder() method as I have used an inner class that implements Comparator //song being a song class which houses getters and setter methods.

Here is my SongSort class which houses the sorting process etc;

import java.util.*;
import java.io.*;

public class SongSort
{
    ArrayList<Song> songList = new ArrayList<Song>();

    public void main(String[] args)
    {
        new SongSort().go();
    }

    class ArtistCompare implements Comparator<Song>
    {
        public int compare(Song one, Song two)
        {
            return one.getRating().compareTo(two.getRating());
        }
    }


    public void go()
    {

        getSongs();
        System.out.println(songList);
        //Collections.sort(songList); 
        System.out.println(songList);

        ArtistCompare artistCompare = new ArtistCompare();
        Collections.sort(songList, artistCompare);
        System.out.println(songList);
    }



    public void getSongs()
    {
        try{
            File file = new File("SongListMore.txt");
            BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader(new FileReader(file));
            String line = null;

            while((line = reader.readLine()) != null)
               {
                   addSong(line);
               }
            }
            catch(Exception ex)
            {
                ex.printStackTrace();
            }
        }

        public void addSong(String lineToParse)
        {
            String [] tokens = lineToParse.split("/");
            Song nextSong = new Song(tokens[0],  tokens[1], tokens[2], tokens[3]);
            songList.add(nextSong);

    }

}

And here is my simple Song class;

public class Song //implements Comparable<Song>
{
    private String title;
    private String artist;
    private String rating;
    private String bpm;

    public Song(String t, String a, String r, String b)
    {
        title = t;
        artist = a;
        rating = r;
        bpm = b;
    }

    public String getTitle()
    {
        return title;
    }

    public String getArtist()
    {
        return artist;
    }
    public String getRating()
    {
        return rating;
    }
    public String getBpm()
    {
        return bpm;
    }

    public String toString()
    {
       return ("Title : " + title + "," +  " Artist : " + artist +  " Rating : " + rating);
    }
}

Now can anyone help me into knowing where I will call the reverOrder() method in the SongSort class as it wont complile.

Thanks in advance.

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3 Answers

up vote 17 down vote accepted
ArtistCompare artistCompare = new ArtistCompare();
Collections.sort(songList, Collections.reverseOrder(artistCompare));
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Thankyou very much, this was exactly what I was looking for. –  James Morrison Apr 26 '11 at 11:37
    
thanks a lot.... –  Hiren Dabhi Apr 20 '13 at 9:45
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One way to implement an reverse order comparator is to implement an Compartor-Delegate that invert the comparator result (by changing the order).

public class ReverseOrder<T> implements Comparator<T> {
  private Comparator<T> delegate;
  public ReverseOrder(Comparator<T> delegate){
    this.delegate = delegate;
  }

  public int compare(T a, T b) {
    //reverse order of a and b!!!
    return this.delegate.compare(b,a);
  }
}

So the only thing you need to do is to use this delegate. For example:

  Comparator myComparator = new myComparator();
  List list = ...;
  List reverse = new ArrayList(list);

  //acceding
  Collections.sort(list, myComparator);

  //descending
  Collections.sort(list, new ReverseOrder(myComparator));
share|improve this answer
    
java.utils.Collections.reverseOrder(Comparator c) will do the same and invert the comparison of your comparator. So you shouldn't reinvent the wheel here but use the Java SE API. –  Peter Wippermann Jul 11 '13 at 12:00
1  
Thats why Puce's answer is the accepted answer. -- Anyway I will not delete this answer because it is a valid one. –  Ralph Jul 11 '13 at 14:08
    
I like this answer because it is more robust, and Comparators have more uses specifically than sorting existing lists. For example, I was able to make use of this in a TreeMap(Comparator) construction, which is a SortedMap. –  ekangas Mar 6 at 22:23
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If you need to use a Comparator which reverses the current order, just return a negative value in the compare method.

public class ComparatorInverse implements Comparator<Object> {
   @Override
   public int compare(Object lhs, Object rhs) {
      return -1;
   }
}
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That's not correct. Have a look at the Javadoc: docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/util/… –  Puce May 29 '13 at 23:19
    
Returning a fixed value independent of the arguments does not make any sense at all, not to mention the reverse order case. Just swap the arguments and now they are ordered differently - that won't result in any stable order at all. –  Alexander Klimetschek Jun 7 '13 at 16:46
    
I see I do not keep the contraints. Even if it makes no sense, it works for me. –  marnaish Jun 7 '13 at 19:45
    
I guess in your code you first insert objects in a sorted order, in something like ArrayList which keeps the insertion order. Now calling sort on that list with the ComparatorInverse will call compare() in a fixed and predictable way with always lhs < rhs. Then returning -1 reverses that order. But if you insert your elements (say numbers) randomly or the sort algorithm changes, it will no longer produce the right result in terms of the natural sort oder of whatever Object is. –  Alexander Klimetschek Jun 12 '13 at 21:37
    
Yes the items are in order - In my solution I wrote to reverse the current order. The Collections.sort() method will call a mergesort which switches all elements in the sorting (by returning -1). And of course you are right if they will change the sorting algorithm it may mess it up :) - so it's not correct. –  marnaish Jun 15 '13 at 14:25
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