Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to write a function that simply returns a string so I can do this:

TCHAR sVar[256] = {0};
_stprintf(sVar,L"%s",GetCurrentTime());

I can't implement this functionality with the following function b/c memory is freed before returning the value:

TCHAR *GetCurrentTime(void)
{
    TCHAR *sVal;
    sVal = (TCHAR *) calloc(64+1, sizeof(TCHAR));       
    GetCurrentTimeEx(sVal); // Populates
    free(sVal);sVal=NULL;
    return sVal;
}

and I can't do this function because there's a memory leak if I don't remember to free the memory in the calling program, which defeats the purpose of having a simple function return a char string:

TCHAR *GetCurrentTime(void)
{
    TCHAR *sVal;
    sVal = (TCHAR *) calloc(64+1, sizeof(TCHAR));
    GetCurrentTimeEx(sVal);
    return sVal;
}

and I don't want to declare memory off of the stack.:

TCHAR *GetCurrentTime(void)
{
    static TCHAR sVal[64];
    GetCurrentTimeEx(sVal);
    return sVal;
}

(here is the function that gets the time):

DWORD GetTime(TCHAR *sCurrentTime)
{
    TCHAR sTime[9] = {0};
    if (_tstrtime_s(sTime, 9) == ERROR_SUCCESS)
        {
        INT i;
        for (i=0;i<=4;i++)
            sCurrentTime[i] = sTime[i];
        return 1;
        }
    else
        return 0;
}

I searched but could not find an answer to this pretty common question. Can someone help me? Thanks.

share|improve this question
1  
What you ask for does not exist. The closest is larsmans' solution, though it has severe disadvantages. If you can live with those. However, the better approach overall would be QuantumMechanic's solution. –  0xC0000022L Apr 26 '11 at 11:25
    
Note that TCHAR, _stprintf, GetCurrentTime, GetCurrentTimeEx, DWORD, and _tstrtime_s are not defined in either Standard C or POSIX. If they are not defined by you in your own (not showed) code, you're unnecessarily locking yourself to the implementation you use. Also don't cast the return value of calloc: it is not needed and may hide errors. –  pmg Apr 26 '11 at 11:26
    
Why not pass any arguments? A simple void writeToMyBuffer(char *buf, int buflen) could do the job. You allocate memory outside the function and just give a pointer to that region. Another way would be to use a global variable. –  Chris Apr 26 '11 at 11:30
    
What about if I did pass an argument, like GetCurrentTimeEx(sTmp), and it also returned a TCHAR? Since I can't have the ideal, how can I implement this like the Win32 function PathAddBackslash? –  JeffR Apr 26 '11 at 11:51

3 Answers 3

You can do this with a static buffer, as in your own example:

char *GetCurrentTime(void)
{
    static char sVal[64];
    GetCurrentTimeEx(sVal);
    return sVal;
}

which actually does not allocate memory on the stack, but in the static region. This solution is not re-entrant and not thread-safe, but it's the only way to get the exact idiom you want in C without memory leaks.

The idiomatic solution would be to make memory allocation the responsibility of the caller and pass a buffer as an argument.

share|improve this answer
    
Why is it not thread-safe? –  JeffR Apr 26 '11 at 11:51
    
@JeffR: because static means that there is only one sval buffer per process, so if GetCurrentTime is called nearly simultaneously by two threads, they may simultaneously write to this single buffer, or one may overwrite the result of the other before it returns its value, etc. –  larsmans Apr 26 '11 at 12:06

You could pass in a pre-allocated TCHAR* that GetCurrentTime() would use to put the time in:

TCHAR *GetCurrentTime(TCHAR *buf)
{
    GetCurrentTimeEx(buf);
    return buf;
}

And that call it like this:

TCHAR buf[64+1];
_stprintf(sVar,L"%s",GetCurrentTime(buf));

Or as

TCHAR buf[64+1];
GetCurrentTime(buf);
_stprintf(sVar,L"%s",buf);

Though of course that is allocated off the stack, which you might not want. On the other hand, since it is not static it will at least be re-entrant in a multi-threaded environment.

share|improve this answer

There are three ways to create an object in C - dynamically (with malloc et al), automatically (on the stack) and statically. You say you don't want to do any of these, in which case I'm afraid you are out of luck.

share|improve this answer
    
What about if I did pass an argument, like GetCurrentTimeEx(sTmp), and it also returned a TCHAR? Since I can't have the ideal, how can I implement this like the Win32 function PathAddBackslash? –  JeffR Apr 26 '11 at 11:52

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.